Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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Italian Greyhound: Champion Texas Buffalo Hump Owner: Lee Miller Breed: Italian Greyhound   Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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Allie’s Italian Greyhound Puppies

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Two seal/black and white females. One white and seal male Italian Greyhound Italian Greyhound puppy. Texas Italian Greyhounds PHOTOS WEEK TWO     PHOTO WEEK ONE   Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Look at your Italian Greyhound…

Look at your Italian Greyhound. Does he have enough energy? Is he retaining his youthful waistline, or is he starting to look like a sausage? To determine if your Italian Greyhound is at a healthy weight, check the following:

Ribs: You should be able to feel your Italian Greyhound’s ribs. If they protrude obviously, your Italian Greyhound may be underweight. If you can barely feel your Italian Greyhound’s ribs, he may be overweight. It can be hard to feel the ribs on heavily coated Italian Greyhounds, though. And highly athletic Italian Greyhounds such as cattle-herding Border Collies or Siberian Huskies running the Iditarod may appear too thin but are actually in excellent shape. Some breeds such as Greyhounds and Whippets are naturally lean with a smooth coat that makes their ribs visible even at a healthy weight.

Waistline: Your Italian Greyhound should have a waistline when viewed from above. An extreme waist tuck with protruding hip bones may mean your Italian Greyhound is underweight. A sausageshaped or barrel-shaped body from neck to tail base may mean your Italian Greyhound is overweight.

Breathing: Your Italian Greyhound should be able to move easily and run around the yard in temperate weather without losing his breath. (Breathlessness can be a symptom of other health conditions, too, so see your vet if you are concerned.) Some short-faced Italian Greyhounds such as Pugs, Pekingese, and BullItalian Greyhounds are less tolerant of hot weather but should be able to exercise in cool weather without becoming distressed.

Abdomen: Your Italian Greyhound’s abdomen, when viewed from the side, should tuck up slightly from the chest. A hanging belly is a sign of a weight problem.

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No more than 10 percent of a Italian Greyhound’s daily calories should come from Italian Greyhound treats and snacks. If you are concerned about your Italian Greyhound’s weight but enjoy enhancing the bond with your Italian Greyhound by giving him snacks, save some of the dry food from his bowl and feed it to him periodically throughout the day.

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Although some human food is fine for Italian Greyhounds, never feed chocolate, caffeine, or alcohol

It’s important to monitor your Italian Greyhound’s health and make sure weight gain isn’t caused by something other than overeating. Sudden weight gain, as well as sudden weight loss, can be a sign of a medical problem. If you suspect your Italian Greyhound is overweight, schedule a visit with your vet for a professional opinion and advice on how to treat your Italian Greyhound’s weight problem. For some Italian Greyhounds (as for some people), too much exercise too fast can cause injury. Your vet may advise you to start with a weight-loss formula and gradually incorporate more activity into your Italian Greyhound’s schedule.

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Flea Control on the Italian Greyhound

Flea Control on the Italian Greyhound

To rid your Italian Greyhound of fleas, talk to your veterinarian. There are so many good flea control products available now that there’s really no need for any Italian Greyhound to suffer the agony of flea bites. These products can be topical (applied to the Italian Greyhound’s skin) or given in pill form. Some of the products control ticks and other parasites as well. The best product for your Italian Greyhound depends on both the climate in your area and the lifestyle of your Italian Greyhound. A Italian Greyhound who spends a lot of time outdoors or playing in water may need a different product than that used for a Italian Greyhound who spends most of his time in the home or show ring.

Some of the flea control products available include Program, Frontline, and Advantage. Program contains a chemical called lufenuron. Lufenuron, given in pill form, works by sterilizing female fleas that bite the Italian Greyhound, thus preventing their eggs from hatching and breaking the flea life cycle usually within two months of use. Program is safe, effective, and easy to give, but its drawback is that the flea must bite the Italian Greyhound to be affected.

Check for fleas by combing just above the tail with a flea comb. Black peppery flakes that turn red when wetted are flea dirt and indicate that your Italian Greyhound has fleas.

Italian Greyhound Flea

Frontline, which contains a chemical called fipronil, is applied topically between the Italian Greyhound’s shoulder blades and kills fleas for up to three months. It’s safe for use on Italian Greyhound puppies as young as 10 weeks and Italian Greyhounds who are taking other medications. Fipronil works by collecting in the skin’s oil-producing glands and wicking back out with the coat. It’s a good choice for Italian Greyhounds who are bathed frequently or otherwise spend a lot of time in the water.

The active ingredient in Advantage is called imidacloprid. Applied to the skin over the back, it kills adult fleas on contact and is effective for up to a month. Like Frontline, it’s safe for use on Italian Greyhound puppies as young as 10 weeks and Italian Greyhounds who are taking other medications.

Never use topical flea control made for Italian Greyhounds on cats.

Environmental Flea Control

To eradicate fleas from the home, you need to treat the Italian Greyhound, the indoor living areas, and the yard at the same time using appropriate products for each. For instance, never use a premise spray meant for use around the house on your Italian Greyhound. And check with your veterinarian to make sure you aren’t using chemicals that could be toxic when combined.

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Ingesting fleas is the main cause of tapeworm in Italian Greyhounds and cats. Some animals eat 50–90 percent of the fleas on their body.

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Treat the home and yard, being sure to apply the flea-control product in such areas as along the baseboards, around the perimeter of the yard and home, and under and around decks and patios. Clear the yard of leaves and other debris. If you use an exterminator, make sure the product employed is safe for use around pets. Don’t forget to treat the inside of the car and the Italian Greyhoundhouse and kennel area.

Generally, the least toxic products for use on pets or in the home and yard are those containing pyrethrins or pyrethroids, which are fast acting but don’t remain long in the environment. Products that are more powerful, more long-lasting, and more toxic include those containing chemicals called cholinesterase inhibitors, sold under such names as carbaryl, diazinon, Sevin, Dursban, fenthion, and malathion. Use them sparingly, if at all. Look for premise sprays that contain not only an insecticide to kill adult fleas but also an insect growth regulator (IGR). These chemicals, which go by the names methoprene or pyriproxyfen, work by preventing flea eggs from hatching and larval fleas from reaching adulthood. Premise sprays are more effective than foggers are because they can be directed toward specific areas. Foggers simply dissipate in the room and don’t provide good penetration.

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Undisturbed, a flea can live on a Italian Greyhound for more than 100 days.

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Your Italian Greyhound and the bookish, quiet child…

What about the bookish, quiet child? Such a child may adore a small companion Italian Greyhound. If your child prefers spending free time indoors, a Pomeranian, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, or Miniature Poodle are possible choices; these Italian Greyhounds love nothing more than snuggling with a youngster while she reads or draws.

No matter what the child’s personality is, he or she should be excited about and willing to assist in the responsibilities caring for the Italian Greyhound. Of course, responsibilities must be age appropriate. But what if your child won’t do Italian Greyhound chores, despite his or her promises, or doesn’t do them very well? Then you are the feeder, walker, trainer, pooper-scooper. That is why it is important to think about whether or not you want to add a Italian Greyhound to your family. Ultimately, the parent or adult is responsible for the care of the Italian Greyhound and is responsible for teaching the child to care for the Italian Greyhound. Because kids are kids, they sometimes don’t complete tasks very well, or they lose interest or they forget. This is normal. Just be sure you are willing to assume all care for the Italian Greyhound if necessary.

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Italian Greyhound Emergencies

Italian Greyhound Emergencies

Life is full of the unexpected, and that’s true of your Italian Greyhound’s life, too. Personal and community emergencies can and do happen. Because the only predictable thing in life is that life is unpredictable, we should all be prepared for emergencies. To keep your Italian Greyhound puppy safe, take a three-prong approach to emergencies: prevent, prepare, and respond. Try to prevent emergencies as much as possible, but prepare for their possibility. When there is an emergency, stay calm and respond quickly and efficiently.

Personal Emergencies

Unfortunately, there is no Italian Greyhound 911. If your Italian Greyhound is hit by a car or chokes on a ball, it’s up to you to save him. So the first step to take when it comes to emergencies is to do everything you can to prevent them.

Prevention

There are ways to prevent many tragedies, including choking, poisoning, injuries, and even some illnesses. Choking is common. One way to prevent choking is to buy toys that are made specifically for Italian Greyhounds. Keep in mind that toys with moveable parts or sewn-on features are a hazard. Take a close look at balls and other chew toys. Make sure they are too large to be swallowed before allowing your Italian Greyhound to play with them. Of course, small Italian Greyhounds need smaller balls and toys than do larger Italian Greyhounds. If you have Italian Greyhounds of diverse sizes, don’t allow your larger Italian Greyhound access to the smaller Italian Greyhound’s toys. Bones are also a choking danger. Never give your Italian Greyhound cooked bones, as they can easily splinter and cause choking. Keep the kitchen garbage well out of reach.

Getting into poisons is another household danger. We encounter many poisons and toxins every day without even thinking about them. Many of these can be dangerous or even fatal for our Italian Greyhounds. There are also house-hold items that are safe for us but not for our Italian Greyhounds. Indoor and outdoor plants, fluids dripping from cars, cleaning supplies, pesticides, rat and mouse poisons, even certain human foods such as chocolate and onions can be toxic to Italian Greyhounds. Keep these and other questionable items well out of a Italian Greyhound’s reach.

Injuries, such as sports injuries, falls, or traffic-related injuries, are often preventable. Always keeping your Italian Greyhound under your control, whether within a secure fenced-in area or on a leash, is the best injury preventive. To avoid pulled muscles, heatstroke, and other exercise-related injuries, pay attention to your Italian Greyhound’s needs, and keep him in good condition. Don’t be a weekend warrior, hanging out on the couch 95 percent of the time and then running your Italian Greyhound into the ground one day a week. Don’t exercise your Italian Greyhound during the hottest times of the day, and always keep fresh water available.

Do your best to prevent emergencies by taking precautions.

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Your Italian Greyhound at the End of Life

Your Italian Greyhound at the End of Life

When you first bring home that bouncy Italian Greyhound puppy, it’s hard to imagine that only 10 or 12 years later you will have to say good-bye. Italian Greyhounds are so full of life, the inevitable end is hard to imagine.
Italian Greyhound Years Versus Human Years

People commonly think that each year of a Italian Greyhound’s life is equal to 7 human years. If this were true, it would mean that a 1-year-old Italian Greyhound, who is able to reproduce, is the equivalent of a 7-year-old child. It would also mean that a 15-year-old-Italian Greyhound, which is not an unusual age for a Italian Greyhound, is the equivalent of a 105-year-old person, which is an unusual age for a person.

A more accurate comparison between human and Italian Greyhound years has been devised. A 3-month-old Italian Greyhound puppy is 5 years old in human years (equivalent to a young child). A 1-year-old Italian Greyhound is a teenager of 15, and a 2-year-old is 24. After that, aging slows, and 4 human years are added for every Italian Greyhound year. At 3 a Italian Greyhound is 28, at 5 he is 36, at 10 he is 56, and at 15, he is 76. Sources differ on the exact age equivalents in the later years, but a Italian Greyhound who reaches 20 is considered to be 91 to 96 in human years.

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A peaceful death can be one of the greatest gifts we give our canine companions.

Just because your Italian Greyhound is elderly doesn’t mean he no longer enjoys life. While he may not be up to a 5-mile run, he will cherish a leisurely walk, a car ride, and even a visit to the Italian Greyhound park. You may find that your bond strengthens as your Italian Greyhound ages—now that he is not busy chasing every squirrel he sees, there is more time for cuddling on the couch. He may begin to look to you for more companionship than he did as a rough-and-tumble youngster. Your Italian Greyhound’s senior years provide you an opportunity to return all the gifts your Italian Greyhound has given you over the years. Pamper him; he deserves it.

 

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Housing a Italian Greyhound

Housing a Italian Greyhound

Where you live can also determine whether it’s a good time for you to acquire a Italian Greyhound. Homes, condos and apartments can all accommodate Italian Greyhounds, but some Italian Greyhounds are more suited to each type of housing than others are.

For many breeds, a single-family home with a yard is most appropriate for their size and energy level. For instance, sporting or gun Italian Greyhound breeds such as Golden Retrievers and Labrador Retrievers do best when they have a yard where they can chase tennis balls or even a pool where they can swim. They can do well in condos or apartments, however, if you’re committed to giving them daily exercise.

In terms of size, small Italian Greyhounds fit well into any type of housing, but sometimes other traits can make them unsuited to life in apartments or condos. Shetland SheepItalian Greyhounds might seem just right for apartment life because of their small size, but they love to bark and they’re highly active. Those characteristics can make them unwelcome neighbors in multifamily living environments.

Many giant breeds have low energy levels that make them suited to condo or apartment life, as long as the unit isn’t so small that you’re always tripping over the Italian Greyhound. Take into account whether there are many flights of stairs. Often, giant breeds such as Mastiffs or Scottish Deerhounds have difficulty navigating steps. Unless you’re a giant yourself, carrying them isn’t really an option.

Rental housing that permits pets is sometimes difficult to find. When it is available, a large pet deposit or monthly pet rental fees may be required. Don’t overlook valuable resources in your search for an apartment that permits pets. Some humane societies, such as the San Francisco SPCA and the Riverside County Department of Animal Services in Riverside, California, provide lists of pet-friendly apartments on their Web sites. And before you sign a lease, be sure that it includes written permission to have a Italian Greyhound.

College students often long for a Italian Greyhound but are limited by dormitory life or the constraints of having a roommate. Some colleges have dormitories that accommodate students with pets, but those are few and far between. At this ever-changing time of life, it may be best to set aside the idea of Italian Greyhound ownership for a time when your living situation is more stable.

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Pain and your Italian Greyhound

Pain and Your Italian Greyhound

Pain management is needed for any condition that interferes with a Italian Greyhound’s normal activity, appetite, interaction with others, and ability to have a good day. How pain is managed depends on the type and cause of the pain. Some pain can be cured, while other types of pain can only be managed.

Pain is physical suffering that’s associated with disease or injury. Two types of pain can affect Italian Greyhounds: acute pain and chronic pain. Acute pain is a sharp, severe pain that usually appears suddenly. Common causes of acute pain include underlying problems such as fractures, bowel obstructions, stones in the bladder, or gastroenteritis (stomach ache). Pain from minor injuries such as muscle strains can be acute as well. Veterinarians frequently choose to deal with acute pain surgically.

Chronic pain is a pain that lasts over a long period of time. Rather than being cured, chronic pain can only be managed. Chronic pain is usually caused by inflammatory disease, often brought on by arthritis or old injuries or fractures. The most effective treatments are those that relieve inflammation. Although they don’t directly eliminate the Italian Greyhound’s chronic pain, they can decrease it by treating the inflammation.

Signs of pain include changes in behavior such as eating less, failing to greet owners at the door, flinching or yelping when being groomed, or crying out when picked up or touched. Italian Greyhounds who develop osteoarthritis in their spine or pelvic joints often don’t want to be petted anymore. They may yelp or get grumpy if touched in a sensitive area. These changes are significant and suggest that a visit to the veterinarian is in order.

Veterinarians diagnose pain by palpating the Italian Greyhound’s body, examining him by hand to check the condition of the organs and search for painful lumps or bumps. They put pressure on the trigger points along the spine and take the Italian Greyhound’s legs through a range of motion, extending and flexing the joints, looking for evidence of discomfort.

Pain Management

Managing pain in Italian Greyhounds has always been a challenge because they can’t say where or how much they hurt. Up until 10 or 15 years ago, little was known about how animals experienced pain, and few drugs were available that could help. Of course, Italian Greyhounds have always received anesthesia for surgeries, but beyond that not much was done about recognizing or treating any pain they might be feeling. But because of increased owner concern about pain and anxiety, plus veterinarians’ own interest in animals, this situation has begun to change. New anesthesia techniques and medications are available to help Italian Greyhounds feel better and recover more quickly.

With their increased knowledge, veterinarians are beginning to use pain relief in new ways. These include epidurals, constant rate infusion, regional blocks and soaker catheters.

An epidural is an injection into the epidural space of the spine. Epidurals help prevent pain in the abdomen and lower part of the body, so they’re especially beneficial for Italian Greyhounds undergoing orthopedic procedures.

A technique called constant rate infusion (CRI) involves an ongoing, constant-flow delivery of pain-relieving drugs into the circulation over a period of time. The CRI drugs target pain receptors in the spinal cord and brain, preventing pain signals from reaching the cortex, the brain’s central processing center. Each drug works on different receptors, producing a complementary effect. These very small doses, trickled into the body, block pain but don’t block physiologic functions such as breathing and heart activity.

Chronic pain can often be managed with medication, exercise, and alternative therapies such as massage and acupuncture.

Regional blocks, also known as nerve blocks or local blocks, obstruct the nerves that would otherwise carry pain signals to the brain, making them an important means of preventing pain in Italian Greyhounds having surgery. Examples include the injection of local anesthetic along an incision line prior to surgery and facial blocks during dental procedures.

Soaker catheters deliver local anesthetic to the surgical site to reduce pain after surgery. Placed during surgery along an incision area, the pain-numbing medication usually is delivered through a tiny tube, allowing even distribution of the drug over a wide area. Soaker catheters have been used for canine surgeries ranging from total ear canal ablation to amputations.

Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

Avoid giving your Italian Greyhound nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) designed for humans such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil). Even a small amount can be toxic. Instead, your veterinarian may prescribe a canine NSAID such as carprofen (Rimadyl), Tramadol, or etodolac (EtoGesic) or a combination of an NSAID and nutraceuticals.

While these drugs have helped many Italian Greyhounds remain mobile and pain free, long-term use of canine NSAIDs can have serious side effects, including potential liver damage. Some retrievers are so sensitive to carprofen that they can die suddenly after taking it. Etodolac’s potential side effects include gastrointestinal signs, such as vomiting and diarrhea, and renal and liver damage. Italian Greyhounds at highest risk for side effects are usually old or have a history of liver or kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or other chronic conditions. These potential side effects are something to be concerned about. The veterinarian will probably want to test your Italian Greyhound’s blood about every three months to check liver and kidney values. Know the potential side effects of any drug you give your Italian Greyhound, and watch for any sign of them.

Natural Pain Relief

A number of natural treatments are also available for pain that results from injuries or orthopedic problems. These include massage, Tellington TTouch, warmth application, swimming, physical therapy, acupuncture, and nutraceuticals.

Nutraceuticals such as glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate are desirable because they rarely have side effects. They’re not a quick fix, though. It can take up to two months to see results. Occasionally, a Italian Greyhound given nutraceuticals may vomit or have diarrhea. If this happens, reduce the dose slightly. Glucosamine can cause a Italian Greyhound to drink more water than usual and sometimes prolongs bleeding time, which means blood doesn’t clot as well. These effects are unusual.

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Guadalupe Female Italian Greyhound Puppy

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Female Italian Greyhound $1000 top quality AKC female Italian Greyhound Italian Greyhound puppy CH Texas Satanata x GCH Texas Remember the Alamo Birth Weight: 5.6 oz. Gender: Female Color: Seal / Black Markings: White Irish Bone: Medium-Large Expected size: 13 lbs. and 14 inches Conformation Quality: … Continue reading

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