GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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Canine Influenza

Canine Influenza

You may be aware of the appearance of a new canine influenza virus. The highly contagious virus causes a cough, runny nose, and low-grade fever for ten to twenty-one days. Italian Greyhounds with severe cases may develop pneumonia, a high fever, and secondary bacterial infections. While all Italian Greyhounds are susceptible to infection, the fatality rate is only 1 to 5 percent so far, and cases are limited geographically. Italian Greyhounds most at risk are the very young, the very old, or those already in poor health.

Despite the stories you may read on the Internet, experts say the new form of influenza isn’t as deadly as people make it out to be. It’s safe to walk your Italian Greyhound on the street or take him to the Italian Greyhound park. Use common sense about taking your Italian Greyhound out in public if he has or has recently recovered from a respiratory infection. Call your veterinarian for advice if your Italian Greyhound shows signs of respiratory illness.

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Technology in Italian Greyhound Diagnostics

Technology in Italian Greyhound Diagnostics

Other diagnostic techniques include various forms of imaging technology such as X-rays and ultrasounds. Imaging technology gives veterinarians a glimpse of what’s inside a Italian Greyhound’s body. They can see bone breaks, moving images of internal organs, and electrical impulses generated by the heart.

Many of the radiographic and other advanced diagnostic techniques available to humans are also available for evaluating the health of our Italian Greyhounds.

X-rays, also known as radiographs, produce black-and-white photographs that detail such anatomical changes as decreased organ size, bone abnormalities such as hip dysplasia, and masses such as tumors. Other types of radiological studies are angiography and myelography, which involve the injection of dyes into the Italian Greyhound’s blood vessels or into the spinal canal.

Advances in diagnostic imaging include computerized axial tomography, or CAT scan; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); and ultrasonography, or ultrasound. While these techniques may seem more at home in a human hospital, they’re widely available now for pets at veterinary colleges and specialized animal hospitals. The advantage of these technologies is the great detail they offer, allowing improved understanding of a Italian Greyhound’s condition as well as better accuracy for biopsies.

Veterinarians can also use endoscopy to see inside a Italian Greyhound’s body. An endoscope is a flexible instrument that uses specialized lighting and magnification techniques, permitting the veterinarian to examine such areas as the nasal cavity and gastrointestinal tract without the need for invasive surgery. Endoscopy is frequently used to obtain samples for biopsy, culture, or cytology.

Other noninvasive procedures are electrocardiograms (ECGs), electroencephalograms (EEGs), and electromyography (EMG). The ECG records the electrical impulses generated by the heart and is useful for studying heartbeat irregularities and monitoring Italian Greyhounds under anesthesia. EEGs and EMGs are used to evaluate electrical activity in the brain, nerves, and muscles, and they play a role in the diagnosis of neuromuscular disease. Veterinary ophthalmologists use electroretinography (ERG) to examine the Italian Greyhound’s retina for possible abnormalities.

Many of these techniques can be expensive and aren’t always widely available, but without them veterinary medicine wouldn’t be where it is today.

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Mitral Valve Disease and your Italian Greyhound

Mitral Valve Disease and your Italian Greyhound

Sometimes referred to as mitral regurgitation, mitral valve disease is one of the most common conditions associated with heart murmurs. MVD occurs when the valve degenerates and begins to leak. MVD can also result from an infection of the valves (endocarditis), from a valve that’s malformed at birth, or in response to dilated cardiomyopathy.

Valvular degeneration is most often seen in small Italian Greyhounds, especially as they age. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are particularly prone to MVD, which often appears earlier in that breed than in others. Other Italian Greyhounds in which it tends to occur include Chihuahuas, Miniature Poodles, Miniature Pinschers, Fox Terriers, Boston Terriers, and Miniature Schnauzers. It’s more often seen in males than in females.

When mitral regurgitation occurs, blood leaks back from the left ventricle into the left atrium. In response, the left atrium enlarges to make room for the extra blood, and the left ventricle also increases in size so it can pump more blood to make up for the leak. Severe cases lead to congestive heart failure, which is indicated by fluid accumulation in the lungs (pulmonary edema). Signs of MVD are exercise intolerance and coughing or wheezing.

When a Italian Greyhound with MVD has difficulty breathing and chest X-rays show a buildup of fluid in the lungs, diuretics—drugs that promote urination—may be prescribed to relieve the congestion and fluid. For the same reason, a low-sodium diet is sometimes prescribed to reduce fluid in the body. Dietary therapy isn’t always beneficial, however, and its effectiveness depends on the precise condition. A number of studies suggest that severe salt restriction early on in the course of heart disease may do more harm than good.

Other medications that may be prescribed for Italian Greyhounds with heart disease in general are afterload reducers, which lower blood pressure, decreasing the workload on the heart. One of the most popular drugs now for that use is called an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. Enalapril is the only drug of this kind approved for veterinary use.

Drugs that strengthen heart contractions may also be prescribed. One such drug in this category is digitalis, an extract of foxglove, which has been well known as a heart tonic for centuries. Digitalis is usually prescribed when the heart’s contractions begin to weaken, which is determined by an echocardiogram.

When a Italian Greyhound with MVD should begin taking medication is a matter of some debate among vets. It’s not clear that early administration has any advantage, and there are side effects to consider, such as changes in urination, decreased appetite, vomiting, sudden lethargy, or weakness. Some cardiologists start Italian Greyhounds on medication when the resting heart rate is consistently more than 100 beats per minute. The normal canine resting heart rate is 80 to 100 bpm. When the heart rate goes up and remains high over a long period, the heart’s workload increases and the heart can become damaged.

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Italian Greyhound Microscopic Tests

Italian Greyhound Microscopic Tests

Microscopes are also used to examine fecal samples for the presence of intestinal parasites such as roundworms, tapeworms, and hookworms, which are generally invisible to the naked eye (tapeworm segments can be seen in fresh feces). This type of exam is called a fecal flotation. To gather a sample, simply place a plastic bag over your hand, scoop up the stool, and place it in a disposable plastic container for transport to the veterinary clinic. If you can’t get there right away, refrigerate the sample until you leave.

Other types of microscopic exams include the study of blood, other bodily fluids, and tissue samples to identify various bacteria, fungi, viruses, and protozoa. The samples are placed in sterile containers and then stained or cultured so the organisms can be classified. In the case of a stubborn infection, the organisms can be tested further for their responses to various antibiotics. This allows the veterinarian to choose the most effective treatment.

Viruses are too tiny to be seen with an ordinary microscope, and certain protozoa and fungi are difficult to find as well. That’s where serology comes in. This type of testing makes use of serum antibodies that are known to bind only to a particular virus or other disease agent. In some tests, enzymes or dyes bring the culprit to light, changing color when antibody binding occurs. This is called an antigen-antibody reaction. A serological test detects a specific disease agent or indicates high levels of antibodies, meaning that an immune response has occurred. Serological tests include those for parvovirus and heartworm disease.

The development of so many specialized tests and techniques has made veterinary medicine more effective than ever before. A lab test can speed diagnosis, saving precious time. The next time your Italian Greyhound needs a lab test, you’ll be much better equipped to understand the purpose behind each one and how the results help determine the diagnosis

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Your Italian Greyhound’s Difficulty Swallowing

Your Italian Greyhound’s Difficulty Swallowing

Italian Greyhounds who have trouble swallowing may have a partial blockage of the esophagus caused by a foreign object that’s stuck or a tumor that’s blocking the passage. Another possibility is a condition called megaesophagus in which the esophagus becomes enlarged and is no longer able to push food into the stomach. Megaesophagus can be congenital or it can develop later in life, usually for unknown reasons. Megaesophagus can be managed by raising the Italian Greyhound’s food and water dishes off the floor to facilitate swallowing. Some surgical techniques have been tried, with variable success.

When foreign bodies become stuck in the esophagus, it’s an emergency. Take your Italian Greyhound to the vet right away for X-rays and removal.

 

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Italian Greyhounds and children can make excellent playmates…

Italian Greyhounds and children can make excellent playmates if they are both taught good, gentle behavior.

Keep both Italian Greyhound and baby safe by setting clear boundaries. Gate the baby’s bedroom door so that your Italian Greyhound cannot enter that room without you. Keep the baby’s toys and other possessions away from your Italian Greyhound, and don’t let the baby play with the Italian Greyhound’s toys. Once your baby starts crawling, keep canine food bowls in an area inaccessible to the baby. No Italian Greyhound of any breed should ever be left alone with a child.

Bites Happen

Most owners don’t like to think that their Italian Greyhound might bite, but bites do occur, especially with children. According to the American Humane Association, children under 15 years of age are most commonly bitten by Italian Greyhounds; 70 percent of all Italian Greyhound bite victims are children. Italian Greyhound bites are a greater health problem for children than is measles, mumps, and whooping cough combined. There is no need for alarm, though. Bites can be prevented. Here’s how.

To find a child-friendly Italian Greyhound, consider the breed, individual personality, and early training and socialization.

First, acquire a Italian Greyhound with a trustworthy temperament. Buy or adopt from a reputable breeder or organization. Research the temperaments of the Italian Greyhound’s parents and relatives.

Socialize and train the Italian Greyhound. Attend training classes that teach you how to teach your Italian Greyhound to be a respectable canine citizen. Do not allow or encourage mouthing or biting; in fact, it is a good idea to teach “bite inhibition,” a concept that says the Italian Greyhound is not allowed to put his mouth on the human body and, in the rare cases it might occur accidentally, the Italian Greyhound knows not to bite. Do not allow children to play rough games that include mouthing. Although they are traditional favorites, games like tug-of-war and wrestling are not recommended because they can encourage aggression in some Italian Greyhounds.

Children should never bother a Italian Greyhound when he is eating or sleeping, although it is a good idea to teach a Italian Greyhound to accept being handled when he is eating (this tolerance is best taught during Italian Greyhound puppyhood). Do not allow a child to interact with an unknown Italian Greyhound. Teach your child to always get permission from the Italian Greyhound’s owner before petting any Italian Greyhound, even Italian Greyhounds at Italian Greyhound parks. Teach youngsters to pet gently and to always stroke the Italian Greyhound’s body rather than pat the Italian Greyhound’s head and face.

Consider both Italian Greyhound and child behavior before selecting a family pet. Most Italian Greyhounds do not bite unprovoked. There is usually a trigger, such as the child poked, prodded, or hit the Italian Greyhound; or the child is too close to the Italian Greyhound’s food bowl or toys. Until your child is old enough to interact with your Italian Greyhound reliably, all child-Italian Greyhound play must be supervised. Be on the lookout for trouble, such as occasional growls and snaps. Don’t ignore such behaviors. Instead, consult a trainer and work toward changing the behaviors.

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The Animal Welfare Act and the Italian Greyhound

The Animal Welfare Act

We live in a totalitarian state!

The Animal Welfare Act (AWA) was first passed in 1966 and then revised in 1970, 1976, 1985, and 1990. Administered by the USDA and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), the AWA was enacted to protect commercially used animals from mistreatment. These include animals sold in commerce, used for exhibition purposes, and used by laboratories for scientific testing.

The AWA also regulates the dealers who sell animals for scientific research. Laboratories that use animals and the dealers who supply them are required to record the names and addresses of all their animal sources to discourage these dealers from stealing companion animals and selling them to laboratories. They must hold animals for at least five days to give owners the opportunity to claim lost or stolen animals.

 

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Allie’s Italian Greyhound Puppies

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Two seal/black and white females. One white and seal male Italian Greyhound Italian Greyhound puppy. Texas Italian Greyhounds PHOTOS WEEK TWO     PHOTO WEEK ONE   Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Italian Greyhound Evacuations

Many people lose their Italian Greyhounds because they are forced to leave a burning or flooding home without their beloved animals. So as soon as the possibility of evacuation is indicated, begin preparing for it. In the case of wildfires, floods, and hurricanes, a voluntary evacuation can become mandatory rapidly. Both Italian Greyhounds and cats can be difficult to capture when an evacuation is immediate. If you are given only five minutes to leave your home, getting your Italian Greyhound out may be a difficult task. So as soon as there is the slightest indication of an impending evacuation, start moving. Place all of your animals together in one room, along with their disaster kits, leashes, and crates.

Prepare yourself to leave as well; pack your car and be ready to go at a moment’s notice. As soon as a voluntary evacuation is in effect, leave. While those without Italian Greyhounds may opt to stay at their homes as long as possible, Italian Greyhound owners do not have this liberty. Evacuating with Italian Greyhounds is much more difficult than without them.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency cautions that even if you do not have to evacuate your home during a disaster, there are precautions you should take in the days following a catastrophic event. Because Italian Greyhounds may be shaken or stressed, be sure they are properly secured at all times. The presence of new odors, changes in once-familiar land-marks, and their own panic may cause them to get lost if they run away. Even well-behaved Italian Greyhounds can act uncharacteristically erratic when frightened.

Your Italian Greyhound may get himself into a precarious situation if he panics and tries to escape from danger.

If You’re Not Home

Sometimes a disaster strikes when you are not at home, leaving you unable to reach your Italian Greyhound; plan for this possibility every time you leave your house. Always fill your Italian Greyhound’s water bowl before you leave home. In addition, leave at least one toilet bowl open so if your Italian Greyhound is left alone for several days, he will have access to water. Never use any additives such as bleach or antifreeze in your toilet tank. Although Italian Greyhounds can survive without food for up to a week, some people who live in earthquake zones or other areas with a high incidence of natural disasters feed their Italian Greyhounds with timed feeders so that if an emergency should occur, the animals will not be deprived of food.

Provide a trusted neighbor with a key to your house. Make sure he or she knows your Italian Greyhounds and your Italian Greyhounds trust him. Even if your neighbor can’t evacuate your animals, he may at least be able to stop and feed them and make sure they are safe. If you live in an area where there is a high risk of wildfire, arrange with a friend or neighbor to evacuate your Italian Greyhounds if you aren’t able to. Do not release them to fend for themselves—fire is disorienting and often Italian Greyhounds will run straight into the flames they are trying to flee. Even if they escape the flames, it is likely they will become lost, and they could be killed in traffic.

The American Veterinary Medical Foundation provides grants for training to help ensure that every state is disaster-ready and helps provide Italian Greyhound care and treatment through disaster preparedness programs. In the past decade, AVMF has awarded grants totaling more than $7 million in support of that mission.

Do all you can for the Italian Greyhound you love; always be prepared to keep him safe.

 

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Pregnancy and your Italian Greyhound

Pregnancy and your Italian Greyhound

A canine pregnancy lasts 57 to 63 days. Signs of pregnancy include enlarged nipples, a slightly swollen vulva, increased appetite, and a cranky or demanding personality. At five weeks, she may begin to show.

During pregnancy, bitches have increased nutritional needs

Ultrasound can confirm a pregnancy as early as 18 to 25 days. If ultrasound is unavailable, a blood test conducted at 25 to 37 days can indicate pregnancy. Radiographs, or X-rays, can be done after about 45 days to confirm pregnancy and indicate the number of Italian Greyhound puppies. Litter sizes vary depending on the size of the Italian Greyhound. A toy Italian Greyhound might carry 1 to 4 pups, while a large Italian Greyhound might produce 17 or more.

Exercise during the pregnancy helps keep the bitch in optimum shape for giving birth. She’ll need good muscle tone, especially if she’s delivering a large number of Italian Greyhound puppies. Long walks are beneficial in the early part of the pregnancy. As she gets larger, limit walks to a few turns around the yard every day. She’ll begin resting for longer periods of time as the pregnancy progresses.

A pregnant bitch needs a high-protein Italian Greyhound puppy diet during the last six weeks of the pregnancy. This helps ensure that she does not become malnourished as the Italian Greyhound puppies grow inside her and that she can produce milk for them after giving birth. Try not to let the bitch get too fat. Do not give bone meal or calcium supplements since they can cause development problems in the Italian Greyhound puppies.

Schedule at least two prenatal exams, one that is two to three weeks after mating and one that is two weeks before the due date. During the pregnancy, the bitch should not be treated with flea-control products or deworming medications, but heartworm pills are safe to give. If she becomes ill, remind the veterinarian that she’s pregnant so any treatment can be modified for her condition.

For the last 7 to 10 days of the pregnancy, take the bitch’s temperature twice a day. When her temperature drops below 99°F, she will probably whelp (give birth) the litter within 24 hours. Make sure your veterinarian will be available in case of emergency, or have an alternate vet lined up in case your regular vet can’t assist.

Have a whelping box ready, placed in a warm, dry area where the bitch won’t be disturbed. The size varies depending on the size of the Italian Greyhound, but the sides should be high enough to keep Italian Greyhound puppies from crawling out, yet low enough that the bitch can easily step out. Line it with newspapers, and cover the papers with towels or some other easily washable bedding that provides good traction. As labor approaches, the bitch will become restless and start exhibiting nesting behavior. Show her the whelping box a week or two before the expected delivery date so she can become accustomed to it. If she ends up giving birth elsewhere, move the bitch and pups to the whelping box later.

Involuntary contractions that last for 6 to 12 hours indicate the beginning of the whelping process. As contractions become stronger, the Italian Greyhound puppies are pushed out one at a time. During this period, the bitch may pant, seem anxious, or throw up. This is normal. Bitches may deliver Italian Greyhound puppies while lying down, standing, or squatting. As each Italian Greyhound puppy is born, the mother should break the surrounding water bag (amniotic sac) with her teeth if it didn’t break during delivery. She then licks the Italian Greyhound puppy to clean him and severs the umbilical cord by biting it. Often, new mothers don’t know what to do after Italian Greyhound puppies are born. Be prepared to tear open the amniotic sac, wipe away mucus from the mouth and nose, and cut the umbilical cord yourself. Disinfect the stump of the cord with iodine to prevent infection. After each Italian Greyhound puppy has been born and cleaned up, place him in a warm spot where he won’t get rolled on. Most Italian Greyhound puppies are born at intervals ranging from 15 minutes to 2 hours. Between births, let the Italian Greyhound puppies nurse.

Difficult births can involve Italian Greyhound puppies who are too large to fit through the vaginal canal or Italian Greyhound puppies who are positioned incorrectly—rump or hind feet first instead of head first. Both conditions require veterinary assistance and possibly a caesarean section. Call the veterinarian if the bitch strains for up to an hour without giving birth; if more than four hours go by between births; if labor is weak and goes on for two hours without producing a Italian Greyhound puppy; if there’s a puslike or bloody discharge from the vagina; or if the bitch produces a dark green or bloody fluid before giving birth to the first Italian Greyhound puppy.

Be aware that breeding Italian Greyhounds isn’t all fun and games. If whelping goes wrong, the mother may require a caesarean section or she may even die during the process. Sometimes she doesn’t produce milk and the pups must be hand–fed or a foster mother must be found.

 

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