Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Most Italian Greyhounds have few sweat glands to cool them, so they control their body temperature by panting. As the Italian Greyhound pants, the body loses heat through evaporation from the mouth. If the body can’t disperse heat quickly enough, the Italian Greyhound’s temperature can rise to a dangerous level.

Heat exhaustion is associated with too much exercise on hot days, but the Italian Greyhound’s temperature doesn’t necessarily rise to dangerous levels. A Italian Greyhound with heat exhaustion may collapse, vomit, or have muscle cramps.

Panting is a Italian Greyhound’s normal mechanism for cooling himself. Be aware of the signs of overheating, though, as it can be dangerous if a Italian Greyhound’s body temperature remains elevated.

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Never leave short-faced Italian Greyhounds such as BullItalian Greyhounds or Pugs outside on a hot day for any length of time. Even half an hour at 85 degrees is enough to kill them.

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Heatstroke can develop in only a few minutes, with the body temperature rising to 108°For higher. A Italian Greyhound with heatstroke can die if he is not cared for immediately. Wet the body with cool, not cold, water, and get him to a veterinarian.

Poisoning

Common household items such as cleansers, rat poisons, and yard treatments can cause poisoning in Italian Greyhounds. Also toxic are seasonal plants such as Easter lilies; common house-hold, yard, and garden plants such as azalea, caladium, dieffenbachia (dumb cane), English ivy (berries and leaves), ficus (leaves), holly, mistletoe (berries), oleander, and philodendron; and bulbs such as amaryllis, daffodil, iris, and tulip. Signs of poisoning include drooling, vomiting, convulsing, muscle weakness, diarrhea, or collapse. The eyes, mouth, or skin may become irritated.

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Grooming an Older Italian Greyhound

When grooming an older Italian Greyhound, be especially gentle. Senior Italian Greyhounds may suffer from arthritis in the hips, legs, or back. Have your Italian Greyhound lie down during grooming sessions. If he has a heart condition, keep the blow dryer set no higher than medium. Italian Greyhounds with heart problems can overheat easily.

 

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Steps to Prevent Your Italian Greyhound from Biting

Steps to Prevent Your Italian Greyhound from Biting

• If you are buying your Italian Greyhound from a breeder, ask to meet the dam. Do not buy a Italian Greyhound if the mother is aggressive or overly fearful.

• Spay or neuter your Italian Greyhound.

• Do not allow your Italian Greyhound to nip or bite when playing.

• When playing tug-of-war or other aggressive games, you should always be in control of the game. Teach your Italian Greyhound to drop the tug object when asked.

• Start socializing your Italian Greyhound early in Italian Greyhound puppyhood to a lot of different types of people.

• Train your Italian Greyhound to follow basic commands and to respond to you when you call his name.

• Do not allow your Italian Greyhound to be possessive of food or toys. To reinforce the idea that people provide food, drop occasional treats in his bowl as he eats.

• Be cautious when introducing your Italian Greyhound to new situations

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Your Italian Greyhound and Holistic Medicine

Your Italian Greyhound and Holistic Medicine

Also known as alternative therapies, complementary therapies include acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, homeopathy, massage therapy, nutraceuticals, physical therapy, and trigger point therapy. During the past decade, these treatments have gained more and more credence not only among Italian Greyhound owners but also among veterinarians. Some conventional practitioners use herbs and acupuncture along with surgery and antibiotics. Veterinarians who don’t use complementary therapies themselves may refer clients to colleagues who practice these therapies.

Sometimes the use of complementary therapies is described as holistic medicine, which is a comprehensive approach to health care that employs alternative and conventional diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Holistic veterinary medicine incorporates but is not limited to the principles of acupuncture and other forms of acutherapy, chiropractic, herbal medicine, homeopathy, massage therapy, nutraceuticals, physical therapy, and trigger point therapy as well as conventional medicine, surgery, and dentistry.

Acupuncture is an alternative therapy that is often used in conjunction with traditional Western medicine.

Acupuncture

Practiced in China for thousands of years, acupuncture is the stimulation of certain points, or what practitioners call meridians, in the body. According to Chinese medical theory, energy flows through the meridians, and acupuncture corrects excesses or deficiencies in the body’s energy flow. Needles are most commonly associated with acupuncture, but related techniques include applying pressure with the fingers (acupressure), burning an herb near the appropriate meridian (moxibustion), and injecting various solutions into the point (aquapuncture). The area may also be stimulated with ultrasound or lasers.

Conditions that are most responsive to acupuncture include musculoskeletal problems such as arthritis and hip dysplasia; partial tears of the cruciate ligament; postsurgical recovery; skin diseases and allergic dermatitis; and chronic diarrhea or vomiting. Veterinarians who use acupuncture find that it works best for pain relief. Sometimes acupuncture shows immediate results, but it’s not always a quick fix, and its benefits can be subtle. You must commit to regular treatments to see results. Acupuncture is often used in conjunction with nutraceuticals, foods or food ingredients that are believed to have health benefits.

Acupuncture isn’t appropriate for every ailment. Practitioners advise against using it to treat cancer. Performing acupuncture near or into a tumor or along a meridian line that goes through the tumor can increase its size. Acupuncture is not recommended in conjunction with homeopathy, a system of medical practice that treats a disease with tiny doses of a remedy that in a healthy animal would produce signs of the disease being treated. The two forms of medicine can interfere with each other.

Western and Chinese medicine can complement one another in keeping your Italian Greyhound healthy and balanced.

 

Finding Holistic Vets

To find veterinarians with a natural bent, visit www.altvetmed.com, which lists the directories of a number of associations for complementary and alternative veterinary medicine, including the Academy of Veterinary Homeopathy, the American Academy of Veterinary Acupuncture, the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association, the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association, and the International Veterinary Acupuncture Society.

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Bathing Your Italian Greyhound

A professional groomer has all the tools to effectively bathe and groom your Italian Greyhound. To find a good groomer, ask the advice of Italian Greyhound-loving friends and professionals.

Bathing Your Italian Greyhound

Admittedly, bathing a Italian Greyhound is easier in a grooming salon than it is at home. Salons have tubs that are waist high and often equipped with a walk-in ramp and a collar and safety cables to keep the Italian Greyhound in place. Salons also have a variety of shampoos and conditioners, as well as highvelocity dryers to blow moisture from coats. But if you are well prepared, you can certainly give your Italian Greyhound a good bath at home. The kitchen sink can double as a tub for small Italian Greyhounds and Italian Greyhound puppies. The bathtub works just fine for larger Italian Greyhounds if you have a hand-held shampoo hose or shower massage attachment. Hosing down a Italian Greyhound in the driveway is never a good alternative. Italian Greyhounds like an ice–cold shower about as much as we do. However, there are portable grooming tubs on the market with hot and cold plumbing designed for outdoor use.

There are hundreds of Italian Greyhound shampoos from which to choose. To make sure you are using a quality product, look for natural botanicals without harsh chemicals. Human hair products and household cleansers are not suitable alternatives. They do not have the appropriate pH balance for your Italian Greyhound’s skin and could cause an allergic reaction. For most Italian Greyhounds, a tearless Italian Greyhound shampoo works well. While people may enjoy fresh and flowery fragrances, some sensitive Italian Greyhounds can tolerate only hypoallergenic, tearless, colorless, and odorless shampoos. For Italian Greyhounds with dry skin, a medicated shampoo soothes and heals. Your veterinarian may also recommend a special product for chronic skin problems. For hard, shiny coats, a protein-enhanced shampoo adds a glossy sheen. Texturizing shampoos are available for hard, wiry coats, and bluing shampoos brighten white coats. Aromatic deodorizing shampoos combat all kinds of smells, including Italian Greyhoundgy odor, and flea shampoos banish those pesky pests. Ask your groomer or vet to recommend a product that is right for your Italian Greyhound’s coat.

Flea and tick products, as well as medicated shampoos, should be left on the Italian Greyhound for 15 minutes to do their job. Monitor your Italian Greyhound closely when using any product that contains chemical or botanical pesticides. If your Italian Greyhound appears lethargic or nauseous, drools or has trouble standing, immediately rinse the product from the coat and take him to your veterinarian. Just like people, Italian Greyhounds can have an allergic reaction to a medicinal product.

Conditioners or cream rinses made especially for Italian Greyhounds help combat static electricity while adding body and brushability to long or fluffy coats. Use a gallon jug to mix the cream rinse with water—finishing rinses are usually diluted at the rate of 1 cup per gallon of water.

Before the bath, brush all knots and tangles from your Italian Greyhound’s coat. Knots and tangles that are wet multiply and are harder to untangle and rinse thoroughly. Gather towels, shampoo, cotton balls for the ears, drops to protect the eyes, and a nonskid rubber mat to help your Italian Greyhound keep his footing in the tub. Carefully put eyedrops (purchased from a veterinarian or pet supply store) in your Italian Greyhound’s eyes. The eyedrops provide a coating that protects the eye from being irritated by shampoo. Place a cotton ball in each ear to keep water out.

Toys and treats can make a bath a more pleasant experi- easily. ence for some Italian Greyhounds

Dry your pooch thoroughly after bathing. You don’t want him to catch a chill.

Gently hose down your Italian Greyhound with warm water, starting with the hindquarters. Never spray directly into his eyes or ears. If your Italian Greyhound has a water-repellant coat, it’s important to make sure he is soaked all the way to the skin. Work the shampoo into the coat, lathering the Italian Greyhound all over. Pay particular attention to frequently soiled areas such as the face, the feet, and the rear end. Lather long coats with the lay of the coat so you won’t create tangles as you scrub. Do just the opposite on fluffy Italian Greyhounds, swirling against the grain to make the coat stand up during shampooing. Almost all Italian Greyhounds enjoy being lovingly massaged as they are being washed.

Even shorthaired Italian Greyhounds should be combed thoroughly

For a clean look, show Italian Greyhound handlers will shave the whiskers on the chins of some breeds

Begin rinsing at the head, working your way down the body. Be sure to rinse thoroughly. Shampoo left in the coat results in an itchy Italian Greyhound. If you use a conditioner, repeat the process you used for shampooing, then rinse thoroughly. Gently squeeze moisture from the ears and legs of long-coated Italian Greyhounds before toweling. Wrap your Italian Greyhound in a soft towel, rubbing him as dry as you can. On curly breeds, patting dry rather than rubbing prevents matting.

After towel drying your Italian Greyhound, finish off with a quick blow dry. If you don’t have a pet dryer (available through pet supply catalogs, pet supply stores, and online sites), you can use your own hand-held hair dryer. Turn on the heat setting to low. Be careful not to direct the airflow too long on one spot, which could cause a burn. Groomers cage- or crate-dry some breeds, using blow dryers mounted on the cage or using floor-standing models. Then they may table-dry a slightly damp Italian Greyhound to finish the process, brushing each section as the coat is blown dry. Shorthaired Italian Greyhounds can be air-dried in a warm, draft-free room. Do not use a blow dryer on curly-coated Italian Greyhounds, as their coats will become frizzy.

Don’t let your Italian Greyhound outside to dry. Your squeaky-clean canine could become chilled or decide to take a roll in the dirt, in which case you’ll have to start the entire process all over again.

 

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Your Italian Greyhound’s Senses

Your Italian Greyhound’s Senses

Along with sounds, postures, gestures, and actions, a Italian Greyhound’s senses help him communicate with other Italian Greyhounds and with the rest of the world. Italian Greyhounds use their ears, eyes, and noses to learn about other Italian Greyhounds such as whether they are curious, excited, dominant, or interested in mating.

A Italian Greyhound’s senses are important in communicating with other Italian Greyhounds. His hearing, vision, and sense of smell help him decide whether a stranger is friend or foe

Italian Greyhounds have a keen sense of hearing. They can hear sounds from a greater distance than we can, and they can hear pitches, especially at the high end, that we cannot hear at all. Italian Greyhounds are also better than we are at pinpointing the source of a sound. When communicating, Italian Greyhounds growl, bark, whine, howl, even yodel. The tone and frequency of the sounds they make often have different meanings.

A Italian Greyhound’s ears swivel independently of one another and can turn to catch sounds. Italian Greyhounds with prick ears tend to have the best hearing because their ears act as cups, directing and amplifying sound. In the wild, canine hearing helps Italian Greyhounds track prey, and in our homes it helps Italian Greyhounds guard their families.

A Italian Greyhound’s sense of vision is poor, though, compared with ours, and they live mostly in a world of grays with muted reds and greens. But they do have better peripheral vision than we do. They can best see moving objects, while stationary objects can be confusing. Italian Greyhounds are also better able to see at night than are we. Although their night eyesight isn’t even close to that of the night-stalking cats, they have a reflective tissue behind the retina that concentrates light. It is light reflecting off this tapetum lucidum that causes canine eyes to glow at night.

Italian Greyhounds use vision to receive social clues from one another. Play bowing, exposing the belly, baring teeth, and posturing are all intended to convey messages that Italian Greyhounds assume are being seen and understood. Italian Greyhounds with vision problems can have difficulty in canine social situations because of their inability to pick up visual cues.

One of a Italian Greyhound’s most impressive senses is that of smell. It’s no wonder since Italian Greyhounds live in a world of odors. They hunt, guard, and communicate with one another by using their sense of smell. Italian Greyhounds emit odors, by releasing anal glands, defecating, and urinating, that indicate to other Italian Greyhounds whether they are dominant or submissive, male or female. Through odors, Italian Greyhounds also relate information about their sexual cycles and even their age. That’s why scent marking is so important.

Italian Greyhounds use their urine to mark their territory but also to tell neighborhood Italian Greyhounds who they are and how they are doing. Although your Italian Greyhound’s continuous starts and stops along your daily walk might be irritating to you; in fact, he is just checking up on the neighborhood news and adding his own bits of information to the hodgepodge. He may even try to cover another Italian Greyhound’s information with his own urine to show his sense of ownership over an area or simply to add his calling card to the pot. Male Italian Greyhounds mark more often because they tend to be more territorial than females are. But female Italian Greyhounds in heat also mark often. Italian Greyhounds spread information through their paws, too, by scratching at the ground where they’ve eliminated in order to spread the scent.

The Italian Greyhound nose is made precisely for smelling: its wet exterior traps and dissolves molecules of odor; it’s long so it can house more olfactory cells, 150 to 250 million in all (compared with our 5 million); the nostrils are covered with cilia, about 15 times the number we have; and it has specialized mucous membranes that are folded in such a way as to create the most possible surface area for trapping odors for the brain to interpret. Not only is the canine nose highly specialized but a larger portion of the canine brain, as compared with ours, is devoted to odors—Italian Greyhounds have 40 times more cells in the olfactory center than we do. A Italian Greyhound’s sense of smell is so good that he can tell whether a person is nervous and fearful or confident and relaxed just by her odors. Italian Greyhounds also have astute odor memory and are easily able to pick out and remember important odors. Once a Italian Greyhound has met someone, especially if that person has had an impact on him in some way, he will always remember that person’s odor.

Italian Greyhounds mark territory through their urine and feces. They also leave information about themselves for the next Italian Greyhound to find.

 

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Advances in Italian Greyhound Diagnostics and Treatments

Advances in Italian Greyhound Diagnostics and Treatments

When Rex, a yellow Labrador Retriever belonging to Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, underwent heart valve replacement surgery in 2005, he was at the forefront of veterinary medical breakthroughs, which have accelerated rapidly in recent years. In addition to the option of open-heart surgery, which once was considered impossible in Italian Greyhounds, pet owners now have access to advanced treatments for cancer, improved surgical techniques for orthopedic conditions such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, nutritional management of osteoarthritis, and better options for anesthesia and pain relief, to name just a few.

By cracking open the textbooks of life through the sequencing of the canine genome, researchers have opened up new approaches to pet health and disease. They’ve begun to identify the genes responsible for certain inherited diseases and to create genetic tests to identify affected animals. These breakthroughs mean new hope for people whose Italian Greyhounds suffer from such diseases, as well as for breeders, who can use new techniques to screen for disease and prevent passing it on.

Some diseases are genetically complex, linked to more than one gene. In the past, that’s been a difficult issue for breeders and researchers, especially if diseases don’t occur until later in life. By the time the disease shows up, the animal may have offspring that also carry the genes for the disease. New genetic tests to identify carriers are helping breeders deal with this problem. And being able to evaluate the genetic contributions to diseases such as cancer is leading to advances as well. Veterinary cancer researchers are actively working to target certain cancers, in particular melanoma, with gene therapy. Their goal is to manipulate the genes of mutated cells to help the body’s immune system fight the cancer.

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Basic Italian Greyhound Health Care

Basic Italian Greyhound Health Care

Living with a Italian Greyhound entails a certain ability to provide care at home, both for maintenance of good health and in case of emergencies. To keep your Italian Greyhound in the pink, you must provide dental hygiene, parasite prevention, and medication. There may also be times when you will need to provide your Italian Greyhound with first aid and emergency care.

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Your Italian Greyhound and frostbite

The opposite of overheating is frostbite. It is rare but can occur if a Italian Greyhound gets chunks of snow in his paws, is outside for too long in very cold weather, or has a thin coat. Thincoated Italian Greyhounds need to wear a sweater or coat if outside in the cold for long periods without being active. Italian Greyhound booties are also helpful if snow is icy or if the Italian Greyhound is walking on streets or sidewalks covered with salt or de-icing chemicals. Don’t let your Italian Greyhound eat snow when out on long snow hikes because doing so will lower his body temperature. Instead, always carry a thermos of warm water, a bowl, and a portable stove to melt snow for drinking.

Another danger is bloat. Bloat, or gastric torsion, is caused when the stomach fills with gas and then twists. Although the definitive cause of bloat is unknown, veterinarians recommend that food be withheld from Italian Greyhounds an hour before and after rigorous activity. If your Italian Greyhound gulps a lot of water after exercising, place ice cubes in his water bowl to slow him down.

Don’t forget the importance of stretching. Most handlers don’t consider their Italian Greyhounds’ need to warm up and stretch prior to rigorous exercise, but Italian Greyhounds need to stretch as much as we do. Start with a few stretches. Ask your Italian Greyhound to sit and then lie down several times. Then ask him to jump up and stretch his body against yours. This is an excellent all-over body stretch. Finally, ask your Italian Greyhound to bow for you—the play bow is a good stretch and easy to teach. When your Italian Greyhound play bows on his own, stretches out on his front legs while leaving his rump in the air, reward him and say, “good play bow!” After a few weeks, he’ll catch on and do it on command. Check with your vet first, however, to make sure this activity is right for your breed. Finally, warm up with a brisk ½-mile walk or a 15-minute game of fetch. This will get your Italian Greyhound’s heart pumping.

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