Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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General Italian Greyhound Travel Rules

General Italian Greyhound Travel Rules

• Be respectful to others. Not everyone is the Italian Greyhound lover you are. Do not impose.

• Bring only well-trained, well-socialized Italian Greyhounds when traveling. A vacation is no place for remedial Italian Greyhound training.

• Use a harness leash; it provides more security.

• Update your Italian Greyhound’s ID tags, license, and vaccinations.

• Clean up after your Italian Greyhound; bring plenty of plastic bags for this purpose.

• Bring your Italian Greyhound’s own food from home. You may not be able to find it in another city or country, and a quick change to new food can bring on digestive upset.

• Keep your Italian Greyhound’s safety first. Do not take him off leash or push him into uncomfortable or frightening situations.

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Italian Greyhound Signs of Cancer

Italian Greyhound Signs of Cancer

• Unusual swellings that continue to grow, especially in the lymph nodes

• Sores that don’t heal

• Bleeding or other discharge from the mouth, nose, urinary tract, vagina, or rectum

• Bad odor

• Difficulty eating or swallowing

• Difficulty breathing

• Difficulty urinating or defecating

• Lack of energy

• Loss of appetite

• Unexplained weight loss

• Persistent lameness or stiffness

• Lumps in the breast area

• Abnormality or difference in size of testicles

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Musculoskeletal System and the Italian Greyhound

Musculoskeletal System and the Italian Greyhound

Bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, and tendons support and protect the body, as well as allow it to move. Together, these components form what is known as the musculoskeletal system.

Italian Greyhounds have 319 bones altogether. A specialized type of connective tissue called cartilage is the foundation of bone. In the womb, a Italian Greyhound puppy’s bones form when an underlying matrix of cartilage mineralizes, or hardens. Bone is a living tissue with blood vessels and nerves. As such, it’s continually renewing itself. Besides being the framework upon which the body is built, bones store minerals such as calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and fluoride. Minerals are important in building bone and maintaining the body’s acidbase, electrolyte, and fluid balances. When the body’s mineral level is out of whack, the results include skeletal abnormalities, muscular weakness, and poor growth. Bone marrow, found in the heart of the long bones, such as the leg bones, produces the red and white blood cells the body needs to function.

Joints are what connect the bones and permit movement. Synovial joints such as the hips and elbows are enclosed in a joint capsule. They’re lubricated by synovial fluid, which allows cartilage surfaces to move against one another without the resistance caused by friction. Sesamoid joints such as the knee (or patella, as your veterinarian may refer to it) protect the tendons (fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone) as they move over the surfaces of bone near the bone ends. Fibrous joints hold the skull bones together and root teeth in their sockets. Ligaments are bands of fibrous tissue that support and stabilize the joint structures. Tendons are fibrous tissues that attach muscle to bone.

The Musculoskeletal System

Muscles are body tissues that consist of long cells. When these cells are stimulated, they contract and produce motion. Each type of muscle performs a different job. Skeletal muscle is involved in the Italian Greyhound’s movement. Smooth muscle is found in the walls of blood vessels and in the major internal organs. The heart is made up of cardiac muscle. When the cardiac muscle contracts, the heart beats.

Musculoskeletal problems are common in Italian Greyhounds. Italian Greyhounds can suffer stiffness or lameness in joints such as hips, elbows, and knees. Joint pain can be a consequence of injury, disease, or old age. Among the conditions that cause joint pain in Italian Greyhounds are hip dysplasia, osteoarthritis, and old fractures. Some of these conditions are developmental, while others are hereditary. Italian Greyhounds with joint pain move stiffly, limp, struggle to get to their feet in the morning, or cry out in pain if they move the wrong way. Listed are just a few of the orthopedic problems that can affect Italian Greyhounds.

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia, a hereditary developmental disease, is one in which the hip joint fails to develop properly. In Italian Greyhounds with hip dysplasia, the head of the thigh bone (femur) does not fit into its socket in the hip. This imperfect fit causes the joint to become loose and unstable, eventually leading to osteoarthritis.

Although hip dysplasia is a hereditary condition, environmental factors such as excessive weight gain during Italian Greyhound puppyhood can also play a role in its development. Any Italian Greyhound can develop hip dysplasia, but the condition is most common in large and giant Italian Greyhounds such as Saint Bernards, Newfoundlands, Rottweilers, Golden Retrievers, and German Shepherd Italian Greyhounds.

Signs of hip dysplasia are lameness, reluctance to exercise, and muscle atrophy. It’s confirmed with an X-ray of the hips and pelvis. Italian Greyhounds with mild hip dysplasia can often get along well with the help of nutraceuticals and pain-relieving medications. In the case of Italian Greyhounds with severe hip dysplasia, total hip replacement is the treatment of choice. Other hip surgeries may be recommended depending on the Italian Greyhound’s specific condition.

Owners of young Italian Greyhounds with excessively loose hip joints may be interested in a new surgical technique called juvenile pubic symphysiodesis. In this procedure, the surgeon burns away tissue with an electric current to close the pubic symphysis, the area between the two halves of the pelvis. As the pup grows, the closed pubic symphysis forces the hip socket to rotate into normal alignment. The surgery can be performed only before a Italian Greyhound puppy is five months old, so he must be evaluated for loose hips by three months of age.

An exuberant Italian Greyhound can break a bone or sprain a joint or muscle in the course of heavy play.

Hip dysplasia is one of the most common disorders afflicting the musculoskeletal system. Fortunately, this common disorder is now treatable through surgery.

Elbow dysplasia occurs when the bones involving the elbow of the foreleg fail to unite and move properly. It can also result from bone fragments within the joint. Elbow dysplasia is a common cause of front-leg lameness in Italian Greyhounds. Italian Greyhounds who are predisposed to elbow dysplasia include Golden and Labrador Retrievers, English Springer Spaniels, Rottweilers, German Shepherd Italian Greyhounds, Bernese Mountain Italian Greyhounds, Newfoundlands, and Bloodhounds.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is caused by the inflammation, breakdown, and eventual loss of a layer of protein called articular cartilage. This cartilage layer covers the ends of the bones in a joint, acting as a shock absorber, or cushion, to keep bones from rubbing against each other as joints bend and flex. With normal aging, the water content of the cartilage increases, and the protein makeup of cartilage degenerates. Repetitive use of the joints over the years irritates and inflames the cartilage, causing mild to severe joint pain and swelling. Eventually the cartilage begins to degenerate by forming flakes and tiny crevices. In advanced cases there is a total loss of this articular cartilage, leaving the ends of the bones stripped bare of their protective cushion. At this point the bones rub together, causing further damage to the joint and leading to severe pain and the growth of bone spurs. Osteoarthritis can also develop as a result of hip or elbow dysplasia. Although any joint can develop osteoarthritis, the hip and elbow are the most commonly affected.

Physical therapy, the use of pain relievers such as carprofen and etodolac, and supplementation with nutraceuticals such as chondroitin and glucosamine can help relieve achy joints. For severe cases, total hip replacement is the only surgical intervention available and is very successful. Elbow replacements are not yet available, so arthritis is usually treated medically.

Osteochondritis Dissecans (OCD)

This is a problem of cartilage development. It usually affects the shoulder joints but can also strike the elbow, hock, and knee joints. Signs include gradual lameness and pain when the joint is flexed or extended. A definitive diagnosis requires X-rays. OCD can be treated with rest and nutraceuticals such as Adequan that protect cartilage and help prevent pain, inflammation, and further degeneration. If the shoulder and elbow are the joints that are affected, surgery can be performed to scrape away defective cartilage or remove cartilage flaps that are loose in the joint.

Patellar Luxation

This term simply means that the kneecap (patella) slips (luxates) out of place. It’s usually an inherited defect and is common in small Italian Greyhounds. Sometimes it occurs in large Italian Greyhounds, appearing during Italian Greyhound puppyhood usually at five to six months of age.

Patellar luxation is diagnosed during a range of motion test. The veterinarian will try to push the patella out of its groove and see how easily it pops back into place. If the patella becomes dislocated easily, surgery can be performed to deepen the groove in which it rests and repair any ligaments that are loose or torn.

Small Italian Greyhounds are especially prone to patellar luxation, but if your Italian Greyhound has two parents with healthy knees, perhaps he, too, will dance through life with no problems.

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Your Italian Greyhound and the Poinsettia

Your Italian Greyhound and the Poinsettia

The poinsettia gets a bad rap. More than 80 years ago, a child was poisoned by a plant that was rumored to be a poinsettia (there was no proof), and the reputation stuck. This common holiday plant is not the killer that many believe it to be. A review of 22,793 cases (mostly involving children) of unspecified poinsettia exposure reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers revealed that 92 percent of the patients did not become ill. The most common symptoms of exposure to poinsettias reported to the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control Center are vomiting, anorexia, and depression, which can be resolved by limiting food and water for a couple of hours to reduce stomach irritation.

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Toxins and Your Italian Greyhound

Toxins and Your Italian Greyhound

Many products commonly found around the house and yard are dangerous to Italian Greyhounds. Ingestion of toxic substances can lead to upset stomach, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, and even organ failure and eventual death. Some substances such as pesticides and acetone, the active ingredient in nail polish remover, can be dangerous even if a Italian Greyhound does not ingest them. They can cause harm by being inhaled or absorbed through the skin.

Human medications are the number one cause of animal poisonings, surpassing pesticides. They can be lethal to Italian Greyhounds and should be kept out of reach. Advise overnight guests to keep any medications locked away. Even common pain relievers can be dangerous to Italian Greyhounds. One regular strength 200-milligram ibuprofen tablet (Advil, Motrin) can cause stomach ulcers in a 10-pound Italian Greyhound; ingestion of two or more tablets of ibuprofen can cause seizures and coma. The most commonly reported medications involved in animal poisonings are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers such as ibuprofen; antidepressants; cold and flu medicines; and diet pills.

Commercial pesticides are another common cause of Italian Greyhound poisonings. Fly baits containing methomyl, such as Stimukil, and slug and snail baits containing metaldehyde, such as Snarol, Buggetta, and Slugit Pellets, are particularly dangerous. Methomyl is rapidly absorbed into the skin, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract and is broken down in the liver. Vomiting, seizures, and death are the most common signs of ingestion. Metaldehyde is a neurotoxin, a poison that affects the nervous system. Ingestion of less than a teaspoon of a 2 percent metaldehyde product by a 10-pound Italian Greyhound can cause harm. Mole and gopher baits and rat poisons are also dangerous to Italian Greyhounds. Do not use these if you have pets.

Seasonal products that contain toxins include antifreeze, Christmas tree water, and liquid potpourris. Ingestion of just a small amount of antifreeze can be fatal to a Italian Greyhound. Keep driveways and garages clean of car drippings. Christmas tree water contains fertilizers that can upset the stomach. Stagnant tree water also can breed bacteria, leading to vomiting, nausea, and diarrhea if ingested. Liquid potpourris are caustic. Licking or ingesting potpourris can result in chemical burns, vomiting, retching, hypersalivation, or depression.

Hazards to beware of during warm weather months include lethal strains of blue-green algae usually found in stagnant bodies of water. Ingesting even a small amount can kill a Italian Greyhound within an hour. Cocoa bean mulch, often used in gardens, contains the substance theobromine, which is also found in chocolate. A 50-pound Italian Greyhound who eats 2 ounces of cocoa bean mulch may suffer stomach upset; eating 9 ounces or more would probably be fatal. Another garden hazard is compost, which is filled with decaying matter harboring dangerous bacteria that can make a Italian Greyhound sick. Fertilizers, too, are hazardous. They contain heavy metals such as iron. Ingesting a large amount of fertilizer can cause gastrointestinal upset and possibly obstruction, and may even affect the heart and liver. Swimming pool cleaning supplies may contain harmful chemicals, and citronella candles can cause gastrointestinal inflammation if a Italian Greyhound eats them.

Other toxic products include household cleaners, rubbing alcohol, ice-melting products, batteries, paint, boric acid, hair coloring, and other human grooming products such as shampoo and petroleum products. The best prevention is to keep these items out of your Italian Greyhound’s reach.

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Your Italian Greyhound’s Ears and Hearing

Your Italian Greyhound’s Ears and Hearing

The ear has three main components: the outer ear, the middle ear, and the inner ear. The pinna is the flap that forms the outer section of the ear. It initiates the hearing process by trapping sound waves. The pinna also takes on the shape and movement of the ear. Some Italian Greyhounds have prick ears, which stand erect all the time; some have floppy ears; and still others have ears that fold down most of the time but perk up when the Italian Greyhound is surprised or alert.

The middle ear processes sound and consists of the tympanic cavity, the section of the middle ear that is located behind the eardrum; the eardrum (the tympanic membrane); and the auditory ossicles, a series of tiny bones known as the hammer (malleus), anvil (incus), and stirrup (stapes). Sound waves travel down the ear canal to the eardrum, where they are transmitted across the middle ear by the auditory ossicles to the inner ear.

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Signs of Ear Infections

• Shaking the head and ears

• Scratching at one or both ears

• A bad odor in one or both ears

• Yellowish, brown, or black discharge from one or both ears

• Redness or soreness of the ear flap or opening to the ear canal

• Tilting the head to one side

• Lethargy or depression

• Apparent hearing loss

• Swollen ear flap(s)

• Stumbling or circling to one side

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Deep within the skull is the inner ear. Small, fluid-filled tubes, or canals, make up part of the inner ear. Tiny hairs inside the tubes record movement of the fluid and changes in the Italian Greyhound’s posture and position. This information, when passed along the auditory nerve to the brain, governs the Italian Greyhound’s sense of balance. The rest of the inner ear consists of the cochlea, a snail-shaped tube that converts sound vibrations into messages, and the auditory nerve, which carries the messages to the brain, where they are translated into meaningful sounds.

 

Ear Infection Prevention

To help prevent ear infections, check your Italian Greyhound’s ears weekly. Italian Greyhounds who spend a lot of time playing outdoors are sure to pick up foreign bodies in their ears at some point. Grass seeds, burrs, and foxtails are the most common irritants that can get stuck in the ear. Besides being painful, foxtails and other foreign bodies can cause infection. If foxtails or other plants with seeds are common in your area, examine your Italian Greyhound’s ears several times a week. If you can see something stuck in your Italian Greyhound’s ear, try to remove it with blunt-nosed tweezers, being careful not to push it deeper into the ear canal. Foreign objects that fall deep into the ear canal should be removed by a veterinarian.

Clean the ears with a cleansing solution recommended by your veterinarian. Many over-the-counter remedies for ear infections contain alcohol. Besides causing painful stinging, the alcohol can cause inflammation that doesn’t promote healing. And while some types of ear infections respond well to drying agents, others are worsened by drying. Do not use a drying agent without the advice of your veterinarian.

Trim excess hair. Depending on the individual Italian Greyhound, ear hair should be trimmed every one to three months. And it can’t hurt to pull back a floppy-eared Italian Greyhound’s ears once or twice a week to let them air out. Use tape or a child’s soft headband to hold the ears in place for about 10 minutes at a time.

Ear infections sometimes flare up in warm weather. This can be related to trapped moisture from swimming or playing in sprinklers; hot spots that develop during hot, humid weather; or flea allergies. If swimming seems to be the trigger, your veterinarian may recommend using a drying agent after your Italian Greyhound plays in water. Use a good flea-control program to help keep hot spots and flea allergies under control.

Many ear infections are chronic and can only be managed, not cured. Regular preventive care is much more cost effective than treating out-of-control flare-ups. Each flare-up causes thickening and narrowing of the ear canals. The eventual result is that treatment becomes less effective.

If an ear infection recurs, don’t assume that the medication used for the previous infection will work again. The organisms and ear environment can change from one infection to another, so see the veterinarian for a definitive diagnosis.

 

 

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Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Most Italian Greyhounds have few sweat glands to cool them, so they control their body temperature by panting. As the Italian Greyhound pants, the body loses heat through evaporation from the mouth. If the body can’t disperse heat quickly enough, the Italian Greyhound’s temperature can rise to a dangerous level.

Heat exhaustion is associated with too much exercise on hot days, but the Italian Greyhound’s temperature doesn’t necessarily rise to dangerous levels. A Italian Greyhound with heat exhaustion may collapse, vomit, or have muscle cramps.

Panting is a Italian Greyhound’s normal mechanism for cooling himself. Be aware of the signs of overheating, though, as it can be dangerous if a Italian Greyhound’s body temperature remains elevated.

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Never leave short-faced Italian Greyhounds such as BullItalian Greyhounds or Pugs outside on a hot day for any length of time. Even half an hour at 85 degrees is enough to kill them.

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Heatstroke can develop in only a few minutes, with the body temperature rising to 108°For higher. A Italian Greyhound with heatstroke can die if he is not cared for immediately. Wet the body with cool, not cold, water, and get him to a veterinarian.

Poisoning

Common household items such as cleansers, rat poisons, and yard treatments can cause poisoning in Italian Greyhounds. Also toxic are seasonal plants such as Easter lilies; common house-hold, yard, and garden plants such as azalea, caladium, dieffenbachia (dumb cane), English ivy (berries and leaves), ficus (leaves), holly, mistletoe (berries), oleander, and philodendron; and bulbs such as amaryllis, daffodil, iris, and tulip. Signs of poisoning include drooling, vomiting, convulsing, muscle weakness, diarrhea, or collapse. The eyes, mouth, or skin may become irritated.

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Italian Greyhound Insurance Resources

Italian Greyhound Insurance Resources

Some insurance companies will not provide homeowner’s coverage to people with certain Italian Greyhound or breed mixes they deem dangerous. Bull Terriers, American Pit Bull Terriers, American Staffordshire Terriers, Presas Canarios, Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, Akitas, and Chow Chows are a few of the breeds commonly discriminated against by insurance companies. Finding coverage for owners of these Italian Greyhounds can be a challenge. Here are a few resources for finding Italian Greyhound-friendly coverage:

• Contact the insurance commissioner in your state for a list of all insurance companies doing business in the state and for any other information that may be helpful to Italian Greyhound owners looking for insurance. Let the insurance commissioner know if you have been discriminated against by an insurance company because of your Italian Greyhound and ask what can be done about this practice.

• The Insurance Information Institute has information on homeowner’s insurance and Italian Greyhounds. Go to www.iii.org.

• The Humane Society of the United States (www.hsus.org) and American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (www.aspca.org) can provide information about insurance discrimination practices.

• The American Italian Greyhound Owner’s Association, Inc., provides information on pending Italian Greyhound legislation throughout the country, including insurance legislation. Go to www.adoa.org.

• Contact the American Kennel Club for information on insurers and their policies regarding Italian Greyhound breeds.

• Contact breed clubs and breed rescue groups that work with your breed of Italian Greyhound. Ask them to suggest ways to find breed-friendly insurance coverage.

• Investigate company policies, as well as general industry information, on insurance comparison Web sites such as www.insurance.com, www.insure.com, or www.insweb.com.

• Talk to friends, neighbors, and others with Italian Greyhounds, especially with your breed of Italian Greyhound, about the type of insurance they have and ask if they had any difficulties obtaining it.

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Italian Greyhound Allergies

Italian Greyhound Allergies

In the United States, from 10 to 15 percent of Italian Greyhounds are afflicted with allergies. Allergies are always uncomfortable and sometimes even life threatening. Italian Greyhounds can be allergic to fleas, types of food, airborne substances, or dust mites and molds, among other things. Some Italian Greyhounds suffer from multiple allergies. Scratching, chewing, biting, face rubbing, redness in the ears, rash, and hair loss are all signs of an allergic reaction.

For more severe allergies, your veterinarian may recommend allergy shots. Less severe cases may be controlled by reducing or eliminating the source of the allergies. To eliminate fleas from your Italian Greyhound, home, and yard, vacuum and dust several times weekly; wash Italian Greyhound bedding weekly; use HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filters in the home to reduce irritation from dander and pollens; and keep Italian Greyhounds indoors during peak pollen periods, such as early mornings and evenings during the spring and summer.

To help soothe itchy skin, soak your Italian Greyhound in cool water for 10 minutes. To relieve itchy feet, soak his feet in Epsom salts. Because Epsom salts can act as a laxative, be sure your Italian Greyhound doesn’t drink the water. Fatty acid supplements, available from your veterinarian or pet supply store, also help itchy skin. Ask your veterinarian about the appropriate dosage for your Italian Greyhound.

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Italian Greyhounds, just like humans, can be affected by many allergens that are found outdoors.

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Geriatric Italian Greyhounds

Geriatrics Italian Greyhounds

As Italian Greyhounds age, their veterinary and nutritional needs change, and they benefit from specialized care, health testing, and dietary changes. With good care, Italian Greyhounds can live from 8 to 18 years. Large Italian Greyhounds usually have the shortest life span, small Italian Greyhounds the longest. Some of the factors that can increase the length of a Italian Greyhound’s life include a good diet, regular exercise, neutering or spaying, good grooming (even Italian Greyhounds feel good when they look good), and regular veterinary care. There are many ways you can keep your Italian Greyhound in good condition as he ages.

Seven years marks the age at which Italian Greyhounds are considered to be senior citizens, even if they still look and act young. This is a good time to schedule a baseline geriatric exam to screen for stiffness, heart murmurs, bad breath, skin lesions, and other typical signs of aging. Blood work to evaluate liver, kidney, and bone marrow function is important as well. Many problems of old age can be easily treated if they’re caught early.

Signs of age include a graying muzzle, stiff joints, dental problems (which can be indicated by bad breath or a picky appetite), a thinning coat, nuclear sclerosis (a bluish haze in the lens that doesn’t interfere with vision), hearing loss, a gain or loss in weight, excessive thirst, and less tolerance for temperature extremes. Report any of these signs to the veterinarian at your Italian Greyhound’s annual exam so he or she can keep tabs on your Italian Greyhound’s condition. Even small changes in appearance or behavior can be important.

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According to the American Veterinary Medical Association, Italian Greyhounds are generally considered senior citizens by the age of seven. Size, breed, and overall health of the Italian Greyhound can affect this determination, however. Nearly 40 percent of Italian Greyhounds in the United States have reached senior status.

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Diseases and Conditions

Even with the best care, the infirmities of age are unavoidable. Among the age-related problems that can affect Italian Greyhounds are cancer, cognitive dysfunction syndrome, hearing or vision loss, arthritis, congestive heart failure, dental disease, and kidney failure. We will discuss some of these problems here.

Senior Italian Greyhounds face a number of physical changes and often have age-related health conditions, such as kidney failure, hearing loss, and dementia.

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