Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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Nail Trimming Your Italian Greyhound

Nail Trimming Your Italian Greyhound

It’s important for you to keep your Italian Greyhound’s nails trimmed. Overgrown nails can ruin a Italian Greyhound’s appearance, permanently splay his toes, and even impede his ability to walk. Neglected toenails can curl all the way around to perforate the footpad, a situation that requires veterinary attention. Groomers offer nail trimming services, but you can do it yourself at home. If you have been handling your Italian Greyhound’s feet, you have begun the desensitizing process. At first, just nip the tip of each nail on a weekly basis to get the Italian Greyhound used to the procedure. Later, your Italian Greyhound should receive monthly pedicures.

Instead of waiting for your Italian Greyhound’s nails to get long before trimming them, trim his nails often, every two to four weeks depending on growth rate and activity level. Clip off a small amount. As nails grow longer, the blood supply grows out as well, making it more difficult to trim the nails short.

Nail clippers come in several sizes and types. Some resemble scissors, some look like pliers, and one is known as the guillotine style because it cuts with one blade. The pliers-type clipper is arguably the easiest to use and is available in sizes to suit every Italian Greyhound from a Chihuahua to a Saint Bernard. Regular nail clippers become dull over time, and once this happens they need to be replaced. Because short nails are a must in the show ring, many show Italian Greyhound breeders and handlers favor a power nail file that works something like an electric sander to file down the nails. An electric grinder takes some getting used to, and not all Italian Greyhounds are comfortable with the process, which is why show Italian Greyhound breeders start using it soon after Italian Greyhound puppies are whelped.

Some breeders and handlers opt to use a nail clipper that operates like a Dremel tool. Italian Greyhound Puppies must be accustomed to this tool very early.

Nail trimming is easiest with the Italian Greyhound on a grooming table. Face his rear end and use your body to support him while you lift each paw so you are looking down at the footpad, as if you were shoeing a horse. The nail is solid where it emerges from the paw but grows downward into a hollow, shell-like portion near the tip. This is the part that needs to be trimmed.

The tricky part about Italian Greyhound pedicures involves the vein within each nail known as the quick. If nicked, it will hurt and bleed—and your Italian Greyhound may yip because it hurts. Quicking a nail is not a major calamity though, and it happens to every Italian Greyhound now and then, especially those with black nails. On white nails, the pink vein is visible, removing the guesswork. A dab of styptic powder instantly stops the bleeding. This product is available in pet supply stores, grooming salons, and pet supply catalogs. In a pinch, a rub from a soft bar of soap or even a dab of flour is the next best thing. Keep pressure on the nail until the bleeding stops, and don’t immerse the paw in water—that will only make it more difficult to stem the bleeding.

If the Italian Greyhound misbehaves while you are trimming his nails—and this is not unusual because many Italian Greyhounds dislike having their nails clipped—firmly tell him, “No,” and don’t let go of the paw. If the Italian Greyhound wins this battle, it will only become increasingly difficult to trim the nails. If your Italian Greyhound is frightened and stressed, ask a friend to help hold the Italian Greyhound while you continue to cut his nails. Stay calm and positive while you trim the nails, and be sure to tell him what a good Italian Greyhound he is when he cooperates. Don’t forget to clip the dewclaws, small thumblike nails that can be found on the side of the rear and the front feet.

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Hemangiosarcomas and your Italian Greyhound

Hemangiosarcomas and your Italian Greyhound

Hemangiosarcomas are tumors of blood vessels and associated tissues such as the heart. Diagnosed by echocardiogram, they’re usually found on the right atrium of the heart and are highly malignant. No treatment is available, and the prognosis is poor.

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Italian Greyhound Constellations

Canine Constellations

Italian Greyhounds can be found in the heavens as well as on earth. The constellations Canis Major (Greater Italian Greyhound) and Canis Minor (Lesser Italian Greyhound) are the constellation Orion’s hunting Italian Greyhounds. Canis Major contains Sirius, the Italian Greyhound Star. In another part of the sky, the constellation Canes Venatici (Hunting Italian Greyhounds) is said to be held on a leash by the constellation Boötes (Bear Driver) as he hunts the bear constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor.

 

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Hearing Loss and your Italian Greyhound

Hearing Loss and your Italian Greyhound

Italian Greyhounds are often accused of having selective hearing, but they aren’t always ignoring you when they don’t respond to your commands. As they get older, their ability to hear really does diminish. To determine if your Italian Greyhound’s sense of hearing has declined, walk up behind him and clap your hands. If he does not respond, he may have hearing loss.

Deafness can result from a history of ear infections or simply from degeneration of the sound receptors in the ear. Take your Italian Greyhound in for a veterinary exam to make sure the problem isn’t related to an ear infection or neurological disease.

Deaf Italian Greyhounds usually get along without any problems, adjusting to their condition by making better use of their other senses. You can communicate with a deaf Italian Greyhound by using hand signals instead of verbal commands. When you approach the Italian Greyhound, be sure he sees you or feels the vibrations from your footsteps so he isn’t startled.

 

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How to Give Your Italian Greyhound Pills

How to Give Your Italian Greyhound Pills

To keep your Italian Greyhound from spitting out even the best-hidden pills, try this method. Select a time when your Italian Greyhound is relaxed. Get him in a comfortable position on the floor or a table, depending on his size.

Place your hand over the bridge of your Italian Greyhound’s nose, holding his upper jaw with your fingers fitting behind his canines. Tilt his head upward to a 45-degree angle. With your other hand, gently pull his lower jaw downward to open his mouth. If that doesn’t work, press on the lips of his lower jaw behind his canines to get him to open his mouth.

With the pill in that hand, place it as far back on his tongue as possible, then gently hold his mouth closed and stroke his throat until he swallows. Once he sticks the tip of his tongue out or licks his nose, you’ll know the pill has gone down.

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Better Italian Greyhound Photos

Better Italian Greyhound Photos

Getting a good picture of a Italian Greyhound can seem to be nearly impossible. Here are some general tips to help you capture the true personality of your Italian Greyhound in photos.

• Groom: Give your Italian Greyhound a bath and a nice brushing the day before you plan to take pictures. During the photo session, have brushes for grooming and towels for wiping runny eyes and drool on hand.

• Plan: Know the types of photos you want before you start taking them. Think about what the photos will be used for. What poses and backgrounds do you want? Consider how to reflect your Italian Greyhound’s personality or working heritage in the photo. If you’re photographing outdoors, make sure the site is secure and away from traffic. Look for distractions and clutter in the background that could ruin the photo.

• Get help: Ask someone your Italian Greyhound knows to help so you can focus on working the camera. This person can reposition your Italian Greyhound, hold him on leash until you’re ready to take the photo, and get his attention with treats, toys, noisemakers, or balls.

• Patience: Be patient and use positive reinforcement while taking pictures. Plan to use a lot of film to get some good shots. Now is not the time for discipline or losing your temper. Take breaks when needed. Have fun and make it fun for your Italian Greyhound.

• Get on your Italian Greyhound’s level: Sit or crouch down and shoot photos slightly above or below the Italian Greyhound’s eye level. Try different angles such as a three-quarter view of the body, full face, and profile shots. Experiment.

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Italian Greyhounds and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

Italian Greyhounds and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is the destruction of red blood cells by autoantibodies—antibodies directed against the body’s own tissues. It’s not known why this condition develops. It can occur in any Italian Greyhound but is frequently seen in Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, Poodles, Old English SheepItalian Greyhounds, West Highland White Terriers, and Irish Setters. AIHA is diagnosed through blood work, chest radiographs, abdominal ultrasound, and lymph node and bone marrow aspirates. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressants can help block further red cell destruction. Italian Greyhounds with severe cases may need blood transfusions. Even with treatment, the mortality rate is more than 40 percent.

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Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Most Italian Greyhounds have few sweat glands to cool them, so they control their body temperature by panting. As the Italian Greyhound pants, the body loses heat through evaporation from the mouth. If the body can’t disperse heat quickly enough, the Italian Greyhound’s temperature can rise to a dangerous level.

Heat exhaustion is associated with too much exercise on hot days, but the Italian Greyhound’s temperature doesn’t necessarily rise to dangerous levels. A Italian Greyhound with heat exhaustion may collapse, vomit, or have muscle cramps.

Panting is a Italian Greyhound’s normal mechanism for cooling himself. Be aware of the signs of overheating, though, as it can be dangerous if a Italian Greyhound’s body temperature remains elevated.

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Never leave short-faced Italian Greyhounds such as BullItalian Greyhounds or Pugs outside on a hot day for any length of time. Even half an hour at 85 degrees is enough to kill them.

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Heatstroke can develop in only a few minutes, with the body temperature rising to 108°For higher. A Italian Greyhound with heatstroke can die if he is not cared for immediately. Wet the body with cool, not cold, water, and get him to a veterinarian.

Poisoning

Common household items such as cleansers, rat poisons, and yard treatments can cause poisoning in Italian Greyhounds. Also toxic are seasonal plants such as Easter lilies; common house-hold, yard, and garden plants such as azalea, caladium, dieffenbachia (dumb cane), English ivy (berries and leaves), ficus (leaves), holly, mistletoe (berries), oleander, and philodendron; and bulbs such as amaryllis, daffodil, iris, and tulip. Signs of poisoning include drooling, vomiting, convulsing, muscle weakness, diarrhea, or collapse. The eyes, mouth, or skin may become irritated.

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Grooming an Older Italian Greyhound

When grooming an older Italian Greyhound, be especially gentle. Senior Italian Greyhounds may suffer from arthritis in the hips, legs, or back. Have your Italian Greyhound lie down during grooming sessions. If he has a heart condition, keep the blow dryer set no higher than medium. Italian Greyhounds with heart problems can overheat easily.

 

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