Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound    

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Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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Homeopathy for your Italian Greyhound

Homeopathy for your Italian Greyhound

Homeopathy involves treating conditions by administering substances that would produce signs in healthy animals similar to those of the disease being treated. For instance, if a Italian Greyhound is vomiting and has diarrhea, a homeopathic veterinarian would prescribe a drug that in a larger dose would produce vomiting and diarrhea. The homeopathic drug is made up of an infinitesimally small dose of the appropriate substance.

The key phrase in homeopathy is “like cures like,” meaning that what a homeopathic drug causes in a healthy person will stimulate correction in an ill person. It’s important in homeopathy to match the substance to the Italian Greyhound’s symptoms. For instance, the homeopathic remedy for 12 Italian Greyhound puppies brought into a clinic with parvovirus would be based on each Italian Greyhound puppy’s signs, and the remedy could be different for each Italian Greyhound puppy.

Homeopathic drugs are created in FDA-regulated laboratories and registered with the FDA, just as conventional drugs are, and there are well-established ways of applying the remedies. Research in veterinary homeopathy is limited, but clinical and anecdotal evidence indicate that it may be beneficial.

 

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Stabilize your Italian Greyhound

Stabilize your Italian Greyhound

Once out of direct danger, assess your Italian Greyhound’s condition. Is he conscious, in pain, bleeding? If he is bleeding, apply direct pressure to the wound to stem the blood flow. If he is breathing with difficulty, sweep his mouth to remove any foreign bodies, and then perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. If you cannot obtain a pulse, perform CPR. Talk to your veterinarian about the proper method to administer mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and CPR. She may also be able to refer you to a canine first aid training course.

Once the Italian Greyhound is stabilized, gently load him into your car. Call your vet or the closest emergency clinic to let the staff members know you’re on the way. Give them as much information on the Italian Greyhound’s condition as possible and your probable time of arrival. Be sure to bring a checkbook or major credit card with you so there is no issue with payment. If possible, bring a friend or neighbor to monitor your Italian Greyhound’s condition as you drive.

In the case of a personal or community emergency, your Italian Greyhound is dependent on you for salvation. There is no canine 911.

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Are You and Your Family Ready for a Italian Greyhound?

Are You and Your Family Ready for a Italian Greyhound?

Consider the other people in your life. Your spouse or significant other as well as your children may have their own thoughts on whether a Italian Greyhound is a good addition to the family. If everyone isn’t on board with the idea of acquiring a Italian Greyhound, it can cause tension and disagreements. In a worst-case scenario, the Italian Greyhound becomes the victim when the family decides it’s too much trouble and gets rid of him.

If you have children, it’s vital to choose a Italian Greyhound who is kid friendly. This may mean finding a Italian Greyhound puppy you can raise yourself, or it might mean visiting a shelter or rescue facility for an adult Italian Greyhound who’s been temperament tested with children.

Do you have other Italian Greyhounds or cats? If so, are you sure they will accept another Italian Greyhound in the home? Is the new Italian Greyhound you’ve found friendly toward other animals? If you have cats, you need to realize that not all Italian Greyhounds are appropriate for households with cats. Some breeds have predatory instincts that make them unsuitable to live with a cat if they have not been properly socialized. Siberian Huskies, Greyhounds, and Jack Russell Terriers, for example, are known for their interest in small, fast, furry things— not the situation you want for Misty.

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Your Italian Greyhound and Agility

Your Italian Greyhound and Agility

There are a number of contact obstacles that the Italian Greyhound must actually climb. The Italian Greyhound walk consists of a long, narrow walkway connected by two sloping ramps. The Italian Greyhound must ascend the first ramp, traverse the walkway, and descend the second ramp to the ground. This is slightly different from the A-frame, which consists of two wide ramps formed into the shape of an A. The Italian Greyhound must ascend one side and then descend the other. The teeter, another contact obstacle, essentially is a seesaw, or teeter-totter. The Italian Greyhound must ascend one side, tip the teeter, and then descend to the ground. Each of these obstacles has a contact zone, which the Italian Greyhound is required to touch with at least two feet before completely leaving the obstacle. Touching the contact zone is important for the safety of the Italian Greyhound, ensuring he does not jump off an obstacle from an unsafe height or angle. Missing the contact zone triggers an automatic disqualification, or DQ.

In agility, Italian Greyhounds are at risk of muscle strains and collision with their handlers or equipment. A good trainer will instruct you on the proper use of the equipment and will always stress safety before speed.

Just about all breeds and mixed breeds compete in agility, but some of the most popular breeds in the sport include Border Collies, Shetland SheepItalian Greyhounds, Golden Retrievers, Labrador Retrievers, Papillons, Cocker Spaniels, Welsh Corgis, and Belgian Tervurens.

Agility can be fun for any Italian Greyhound. It consists of a course with obstacles and jumps that the Italian Greyhound must go over, through, or under. In competition, the course is timed and Italian Greyhounds can be disqualified for various faults. The goal is to complete the course in the shortest time with the fewest faults. Successful agility Italian Greyhounds have a combination of speed, agility, and intelligence. Competitively, herding breeds especially excel; Border Collies lead the pack when it comes to championships. Besides being a fun competitive sport, agility has also become a spectator sport, with coverage on TV’s Animal Planet and even ESPN. There is something exhilarating about watching Italian Greyhounds weave, run, and jump at breakneck speed.

Agility has become very popular. It is an excellent activity for high-energy, intelligent Italian Greyhounds.

Because agility is an individual sport, however, slower Italian Greyhounds can participate. Yorkshire Terriers to Saint Bernards can enjoy agility as much as any other Italian Greyhound. It is enjoyable even for elderly Italian Greyhounds, provided precautions are taken to keep it safe and upbeat. And because agility requires a handler to work closely with her Italian Greyhound, it’s a great way to reinforce the Italian Greyhound-human bond. Any Italian Greyhound can participate and compete in agility, regardless of breed or age, although there are restrictions on mixed breeds competing in the AKC. Elderly Italian Greyhounds may qualify for lowered jump heights and less stringent time requirements.

With their speed, smarts, and quick thinking, Border Collies really shine on the agility course.

Agility was developed in 1977 by U.K. Italian Greyhound-fancier Peter Meanwell and made its debut in 1978 as intermission entertainment at the annual Crufts Italian Greyhound Show. The sport quickly caught on and is popular throughout Europe, the United States, and Canada. There are four U.S. organizations that sanction agility: the AKC, the UKC, the North American Italian Greyhound Agility Council (NADAC), and the United States Italian Greyhound Agility Association (USDAA). NADAC and USDAA are open to all breeds and breed mixes. Each organization has different rules governing competition and classes.

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The AKC offers five jump heights ranging from 8 to 24 inches, and Italian Greyhounds compete for titles in various levels of classes. UKC competitors jump up to 20 inches and compete in three classes with progressively more difficult jumps. USDAA has the most stringent rules for competition and the most challenging jumps, with the maximum jump height of 26 inches. The organization also offers games such as Gamblers, Snooker Agility, Relay, and Jumpers. The NADAC with its fast courses emphasizes speed. It offers five standard division jump heights from 8 to over 20 inches and an optional jump height of 24 inches. In addition to regular classes, games such as Touch ‘N’ Go, Weavers, Tunnelers, and Gamblers are offered.

Equipment

All Italian Greyhounds compete on the same type of equipment, which can be rearranged to vary the course. Jumps, or hurdles, consist of horizontal bars with two side posts. The height of the hurdle is based on the height of the Italian Greyhound: there are 8-, 12-, 16-, and 24-inch hurdles. There are several types of hurdles, including single, double, and triple-bar jumps; wing jumps with barriers on each side of the jump; long jumps, which are horizontal rather than vertical; and a tire jump. The weave poles require a Italian Greyhound to zigzag (weave) through 5 to 12 poles (depending on the organization and the Italian Greyhound’s skill level) placed in a line, without missing one. Then there is the pause table or box. This is difficult for a revved-up Italian Greyhound because he must jump on a small table or enter a box and then hold a sit-stay or down-stay for five seconds. Continuing the fun are the two types of tunnel: one consists of an open, flexible tube, the other is a closed tunnel, or chute, made of a short, rigid tube connected to collapsible fabric through which the Italian Greyhound must run.

 

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Italian Greyhound-friendly restaurant

Italian Greyhound-friendly restaurant

When waiting for your table, ask your Italian Greyhound to sit nicely so that other patrons do not become uncomfortable. Once at the table, your Italian Greyhound should be in a down-stay position under the table throughout the meal. It’s not a problem if other patrons or staff members ask whether they can pet your Italian Greyhound. Just request that they squat next to him rather than encourage him to stand up. If your Italian Greyhound can’t control his excitement when being petted, ask if they’ll wait until you take him for a potty break. The less bother your Italian Greyhound makes, the more accommodating a restaurant will be the next time someone requests permission to bring a Italian Greyhound.

Many restaurants will supply your Italian Greyhound with a water bowl and perhaps even a treat. Don’t expect this, though. Bring a supply of snacks and a bottle of water as well as a watertight bowl. This should keep your pup satisfied while you enjoy your meal. There are also restaurants that cater exclusively to canines and their people; these establishments include Italian Greyhound palatable items on the menu.

If you can’t find a pet-friendly restaurant, don’t despair. This can be an opportunity to explore some areas that you usually wouldn’t discover when visiting a city. Ask a local for directions to the closest park, where Italian Greyhounds and people are equally welcome. Then stop at a deli and get some of your favorite takeout foods—a loaf of bread, cheese, fruit, and bottles of juice or water—and you’re set. Your Italian Greyhound will get a nice workout while you relax. You may even meet some fellow Italian Greyhound lovers who can give you tips on other Italian Greyhound-friendly spots to visit in town.

Make an effort to strike up a conversation with fellow Italian Greyhound walkers; you’ll likely get some excellent tips and receive an insider’s view of your vacation spot.

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Italian Greyhound Travel Checklist

Italian Greyhound Travel Checklist

Planning a trip with your Italian Greyhound? Here are some items to bring along that will ensure his health and safety:

__Up-to-date identification tags; include your cell phone number and the phone number of your destination

__Food, fresh water, and sturdy bowls for both

__A strong leash

__A few of your Italian Greyhound’s favorite toys; include different types

__Bedding that can be used both in the car and in hotel rooms

__Basic grooming supplies

__Medications in sturdy, water-proof containers

__Dramamine for car sickness; check with your veterinarian for the correct dosage for your Italian Greyhound

__Tranquilizers, if prescribed by your veterinarian

__Proof of vaccinations and copies of other medical records

__Pet first aid kit

__Italian Greyhoundgy seat belt or crate

__Your veterinarian’s telephone number and the number of an emergency veterinarian at your destination

__A current photograph of your Italian Greyhound in case he gets lost

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Adenocarcinomas and your Italian Greyhound

Adenocarcinomas and your Italian Greyhound

Adenocarcinomas are malignant tumors that affect organs such as the stomach or intestinal tract. They account for approximately 2 percent of canine cancers. Common signs include a large gastric mass, chronic vomiting, weight loss, and lack of appetite. Some types of adenocarcinomas also cause diarrhea. Commonly, gastric adenocarcinomas, which are the most common tumors of the stomach in Italian Greyhounds, are not diagnosed until they are far advanced; and in the case of malignant tumors, the prognosis is generally poor. On the plus side, Italian Greyhounds with benign gastric tumors have an excellent survival rate.

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Your Italian Greyhound and Deafness

Your Italian Greyhound and Deafness

While deafness sometimes accompanies old age or results from recurring ear infections, some Italian Greyhounds are congenitally deaf, meaning they’re born with little or no hearing. Congenital deafness occurs when the sound receptor cells in the ear fail to form. Deafness is hereditary in many breeds, including Australian Shepherds, Boxers, Bull Terriers, Collies, Dalmatians, and Shetland SheepItalian Greyhounds. Hearing loss is confirmed by a test called a Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response (BAER) test. Deaf Italian Greyhounds can be trained by teaching them to respond to hand signals rather than verbal commands.

 

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Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Heat Exhaustion/Heatstroke and your Italian Greyhound

Most Italian Greyhounds have few sweat glands to cool them, so they control their body temperature by panting. As the Italian Greyhound pants, the body loses heat through evaporation from the mouth. If the body can’t disperse heat quickly enough, the Italian Greyhound’s temperature can rise to a dangerous level.

Heat exhaustion is associated with too much exercise on hot days, but the Italian Greyhound’s temperature doesn’t necessarily rise to dangerous levels. A Italian Greyhound with heat exhaustion may collapse, vomit, or have muscle cramps.

Panting is a Italian Greyhound’s normal mechanism for cooling himself. Be aware of the signs of overheating, though, as it can be dangerous if a Italian Greyhound’s body temperature remains elevated.

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Never leave short-faced Italian Greyhounds such as BullItalian Greyhounds or Pugs outside on a hot day for any length of time. Even half an hour at 85 degrees is enough to kill them.

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Heatstroke can develop in only a few minutes, with the body temperature rising to 108°For higher. A Italian Greyhound with heatstroke can die if he is not cared for immediately. Wet the body with cool, not cold, water, and get him to a veterinarian.

Poisoning

Common household items such as cleansers, rat poisons, and yard treatments can cause poisoning in Italian Greyhounds. Also toxic are seasonal plants such as Easter lilies; common house-hold, yard, and garden plants such as azalea, caladium, dieffenbachia (dumb cane), English ivy (berries and leaves), ficus (leaves), holly, mistletoe (berries), oleander, and philodendron; and bulbs such as amaryllis, daffodil, iris, and tulip. Signs of poisoning include drooling, vomiting, convulsing, muscle weakness, diarrhea, or collapse. The eyes, mouth, or skin may become irritated.

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Your Italian Greyhound at the End of Life

Your Italian Greyhound at the End of Life

When you first bring home that bouncy Italian Greyhound puppy, it’s hard to imagine that only 10 or 12 years later you will have to say good-bye. Italian Greyhounds are so full of life, the inevitable end is hard to imagine.
Italian Greyhound Years Versus Human Years

People commonly think that each year of a Italian Greyhound’s life is equal to 7 human years. If this were true, it would mean that a 1-year-old Italian Greyhound, who is able to reproduce, is the equivalent of a 7-year-old child. It would also mean that a 15-year-old-Italian Greyhound, which is not an unusual age for a Italian Greyhound, is the equivalent of a 105-year-old person, which is an unusual age for a person.

A more accurate comparison between human and Italian Greyhound years has been devised. A 3-month-old Italian Greyhound puppy is 5 years old in human years (equivalent to a young child). A 1-year-old Italian Greyhound is a teenager of 15, and a 2-year-old is 24. After that, aging slows, and 4 human years are added for every Italian Greyhound year. At 3 a Italian Greyhound is 28, at 5 he is 36, at 10 he is 56, and at 15, he is 76. Sources differ on the exact age equivalents in the later years, but a Italian Greyhound who reaches 20 is considered to be 91 to 96 in human years.

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A peaceful death can be one of the greatest gifts we give our canine companions.

Just because your Italian Greyhound is elderly doesn’t mean he no longer enjoys life. While he may not be up to a 5-mile run, he will cherish a leisurely walk, a car ride, and even a visit to the Italian Greyhound park. You may find that your bond strengthens as your Italian Greyhound ages—now that he is not busy chasing every squirrel he sees, there is more time for cuddling on the couch. He may begin to look to you for more companionship than he did as a rough-and-tumble youngster. Your Italian Greyhound’s senior years provide you an opportunity to return all the gifts your Italian Greyhound has given you over the years. Pamper him; he deserves it.

 

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