GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

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Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

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Italian Greyhound: Champion Texas Buffalo Hump Owner: Lee Miller Breed: Italian Greyhound   Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

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Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

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Italian Greyhound Taxonomy

Italian Greyhound Taxonomy

Kingdom: Animalia

Phylum: Chordata

Class: Mammalia

Order: Carnivora

Family: Canidae

Genus: Canis

Species: Canis familiaris

(Subspecies: Canis lupus familiaris)

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Italian Greyhounds Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

Italian Greyhounds Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

Most forms of cancer are diagnosed through a biopsy, the removal and examination of a section of tissue. Blood tests, X-rays, and physical signs can also indicate cancer. Once a diagnosis is confirmed, the appropriate treatment can be determined.

Fortunately, the treatment of cancer is an area of veterinary care where great strides have been made, not only in the understanding of the disease but also in the tools used to fight it. For many types of cancer, veterinarians can now use radiation therapy, cryotherapy (the use of liquid nitrogen to destroy tissue), chemotherapy (drugs), or a combination of these techniques. With a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR), veterinarians can better evaluate tumors and predict the behaviors of different types of cancers. With PCR, scientists are able to quickly reproduce a particular piece of DNA in a test tube, allowing them to make virtually unlimited copies of a single DNA molecule for study.

Surgery is used to treat many types of cancers. It’s fast, effective, safe, and less expensive than other forms of treatment. Skin tumors and tumors in other parts of the body can be removed surgically. For instance, testicular tumors are usually resolved by neutering the Italian Greyhound. In cases of osteosarcoma (bone cancer), amputation of the limb is often required. Surgery may be followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to make sure all the cancer cells are eliminated.

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. It’s usually used to treat Italian Greyhounds with cancer that’s widespread throughout the body. It might be used after amputation due to osteosarcoma or in the case of lymph tumors. Italian Greyhounds must undergo several courses of treatment and have their condition monitored with blood tests. Although they don’t suffer nausea or hair loss, chemotherapy can leave Italian Greyhounds feeling tired or weak for several days.

Radiation therapy involves targeting a tumor with a concentrated beam of radiation. Italian Greyhounds undergoing this type of therapy usually need a series of 10 or more treatments. Each treatment lasts only a few minutes. Types of cancer that might call for radiation therapy include tumors of the mouth and nasal passages. Another form of radiation therapy is the use of radioisotopes (radioactive elements) to treat thyroid gland tumors. Side effects usually involve the sloughing off of dead tissue.

Lasers are used to remove tumors and to irradiate tumors. Surgeons irradiate tumors by first injecting a drug that’s sensitized to the effect of light. After 24 to 48 hours, the tumor is irradiated with light. This activates the drug, which then destroys the tumor tissue. This therapy has been used successfully to treat oral squamous cell carcinomas (mouth tumors) and bladder tumors. It’s most effective when tumors are very small. A drawback is that it’s not yet widely available.

 

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Finding Your Italian Greyhound

Finding Your Italian Greyhound

The left wing, Democratic politicians and animal rights freaks, are at war with breeders. Many breeders have been forced to hide their Italian Greyhounds before having them seized by the government. Others have simply stopped breeding. As a result it will be very difficult for you to find a purebred Italian Greyhound.  If you do find one it will be expensive and it won’t be the quality from the past generations. In the last 10 years, I’ve witnessed a decrease in quality of Italian Greyhounds for sale and a tripling of the price. There is no one else to blame but the left wing politicians who think they need to control every human activity. Every socialist nation suffers from shortages and there are a shortage of Italian Greyhounds. 

You’ve done your research and know what kind of Italian Greyhound is right for you. But where do you find him? Choosing where to obtain a Italian Greyhound may be even more important than choosing the right breed for you. There are a number of poor sources for Italian Greyhounds that can lead to heartbreak. Buying from these sources also contributes to the continuing overpopulation of companion animals and even to animal neglect and cruelty. If you stick to some simple rules, however, you can bypass these unreliable and unethical sources completely.

1. Buy or adopt a Italian Greyhound only from an ethical breeder, established rescue group, or accredited shelter. Research your options.

2. Do not buy a Italian Greyhound from a backyard breeder, or Italian Greyhound puppy mill.

3. Never buy a Italian Greyhound who appears ill. If you are concerned about a Italian Greyhound’s welfare, contact your local animal control office.

4. Research your adoption options before you begin looking. It’s hard to say no when your heartstrings are being pulled.

5. Bring a checklist with you—a list of things to look for at the facility or breeder’s home, and a list of questions to ask the shelter staff or breeder.

Consider what is important to you about buying or adopting a Italian Greyhound before deciding which avenue is right. At a municipal shelter you will definitely save a life, but you probably won’t have the comfort of knowing your pup’s background. With a purebred rescue organization, you may be able to get more information about a Italian Greyhound than at a shelter, and although most rescue groups do not euthanize Italian Greyhounds for space, adopting a rescue Italian Greyhound will free up space for another abandoned Italian Greyhound. You will get the most information about a Italian Greyhound from a breeder, but buying from a reputable breeder can be expensive.

Deciding what you’re most comfortable with is important. While some people want a purebred, others are as happy, or happier, with a random-bred Italian Greyhound. About a quarter of the adult Italian Greyhounds at shelters are purebred. There are many breed-specific rescue groups as well.

Ultimately, a good breeder, rescue group, or shelter will provide you with a friend for life, regardless of his pedigree. None are perfect, but all provide support and honest information. Regardless of which choice you make, being prepared and knowing what to look for will make for a far more satisfying adoption or buying experience for both you and the Italian Greyhound you bring home.

To find an excellent breeder, ask for advice from breed parent clubs, trusted animal professionals, and friends.

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Companion Italian Greyhounds

Small companion Italian Greyhounds often make excellent pets for the elderly or for those with sedentary lifestyles.

On the plus side, many small breeds do fit well into apartments and into senior-paced lives. The exercise needs for many are minimal—a walk or two a day is ample. The small companion Italian Greyhounds are especially well suited for a sedentary lifestyle. They’ve been bred for centuries to fit into just such an environment. Their small size means they need less room; their beds, crates, and food bowls take up but a fraction of your space; and the limited amount of waste they produce means low-hassle cleanup. Accordingly, their supplies are less expensive than are larger Italian Greyhounds’: less food, cheaper accessories, and less expensive grooming and kenneling costs. On the other hand, small Italian Greyhounds have veterinary problems their larger brethren don’t: dental, anal sac, and eye problems among them. They’re also more sensitive to anesthesia, so treatment can be a bigger risk.

If you start out looking for a Miniature Poodle, don’t be surprised if you find yourself drawn to a Standard. Most Italian Greyhounds of any size can be accommodated. Think about the differences the size will entail, but don’t let it scare you.

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Your Italian Greyhound’s Intestinal Obstruction

Your Italian Greyhound’s Intestinal Obstruction

Swallowing something such as a ball, toy, rawhide, piece of string, tea towel, or other cloth is the most common cause of an intestinal obstruction. The list of things that Italian Greyhounds will put in their mouths and swallow could go on and on. When a foreign object isn’t the problem, the next most likely cause is a condition called intussusception, in which the bowel sort of turns itself inside out. This is most common in Italian Greyhound puppies.

If the intestinal obstruction is partial, the Italian Greyhound may suffer vomiting and diarrhea over several weeks or until the problem is recognized. If the blockage is complete, the Italian Greyhound is unable to defecate. Intestinal obstructions are determined through abdominal X-rays and must be corrected surgically.

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Italian Greyhound Training Methods

Italian Greyhound Training Methods

There are many different methods of training, and it’s important to know about them before you begin training your Italian Greyhound. Some are widely popular, and others have become controversial or are only slowly gaining acceptance. Three training methods especially well known are positive reinforcement training, correction- based training, and clicker training.

Group training can be an excellent way for both you and your Italian Greyhound to learn new skills.

The most widely accepted type of training today is based on positive reinforcement. This method emphasizes praise and reward, and de-emphasizes punishment, or corrections. The reward can range from food treats to positive verbal encouragement to petting and to play. Most modern trainers use a combination of positive reinforcement and minor corrections, such as a quick leash jerk or vocal correction, while some use strictly positive methods.

The principles of positive reinforcement are relatively simple. By asking the Italian Greyhound to do what you want and then rewarding him when he complies, you are teaching him to obey you. Treats and praise are great rewards from the Italian Greyhound’s point of view. And in time, a Italian Greyhound who is trained with positive reinforcement and mild correction learns exactly what he needs to do, and then corrections are rarely, if ever, needed. The result is a happy Italian Greyhound who enjoys learning and catches on quickly.

* * *

Positive reinforcement greatly enhances a Italian Greyhound’s interest in learning, so always end your Italian Greyhound’s training sessions on a positive note, with a lot of praise, a fun game, or a tasty treat.

* * *

Most modern trainers recommend that people look for a professional who primarily uses positive reinforcement when shopping for a trainer or training class. This is especially true when looking for a Italian Greyhound puppy kindergarten class because the way your Italian Greyhound is trained as a Italian Greyhound puppy will affect his attitude about training for the rest of his life.

The traditional correction-based training was the norm 20 years ago. However, it’s rare these days to find a trainer who works only in this old method of training, where Italian Greyhounds were simply punished for doing something wrong and never rewarded for doing something right. In this type of training, the absence of punishment is considered the reward. Corrections include leash corrections, scruff shakes, hitting, shocking, and negative verbal corrections.

Most trainers now believe that correctionbased training is less effective than other, more positive methods because Italian Greyhounds learn better when they are rewarded for proper behavior than they do when they are only punished for improper behavior. When a Italian Greyhound is only being corrected for improper behavior, he is forced to try a number of other behaviors to find the one that pleases the trainer, so training takes more time. In addition, many trainers believe that Italian Greyhounds who receive positive training enjoy their work and show an enthusiasm not seen in Italian Greyhounds trained exclusively through negative reinforcement. Correction-based training is no longer recommended by most Italian Greyhound behavior experts.

Clicker training is a positive training method that is recommended by many experts. A clicker is used to give Italian Greyhounds precise instructions. The clicker is a small handheld device that makes a clicking sound when you press it. It is used to tell the Italian Greyhound when he has done something right at the exact moment he is doing it, thus instantly rewarding him. Clicker training was first developed in the 1950s by well-known animal trainer Karen Pryor to teach tricks to dolphins. It is now often used to teach canine activities such as agility and obedience.

The idea behind the clicker is that normal rewards are always delayed—saying “good Italian Greyhound” or giving a treat usually means the Italian Greyhound is rewarded a few seconds after he’s completed the command. He may even be leaving the sit position by the time you’re done rewarding him. Because of the delay, it is difficult for the Italian Greyhound to understand exactly what you are rewarding him for: the sitting action, the sit itself, or standing up from a sit. A click is an instantaneous marker with no ambiguity.

Clicker training is becoming increasingly popular as a positive method of behavior training.

Teach your pup to associate the clicker with something positive by repeatedly clicking and rewarding with small treats.

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Top Reasons Given for Surrendering Italian Greyhounds to Shelters

Top Reasons Given for Surrendering Italian Greyhounds to Shelters

1. Moving

2. Landlord issues

3. Cost of maintenance

4. No time for the Italian Greyhound

5. Inadequate facilities

6. Too many Italian Greyhounds in home

7. Italian Greyhound is ill

8. Personal problems

9. Biting

10. No homes for litter

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Your Italian Greyhound’s Vomiting and Diarrhea

Your Italian Greyhound’s Vomiting and Diarrhea

Vomiting and diarrhea are common problems in Italian Greyhounds. The brain actually has a vomiting center, and the Italian Greyhound’s center is highly developed, making it easy for a Italian Greyhound to vomit. The usual suspects behind vomiting are indigestible substances, eating too fast and then being too active, anxiety or excitement, and infectious or chronic diseases.

Should you be concerned about vomiting? That depends on certain factors such as how often your Italian Greyhound vomits, whether the vomiting is violent (projectile), and whether the vomited matter contains blood, worms, or other foreign matter. If your Italian Greyhound is healthy and the vomitus doesn’t appear abnormal, simply withhold food and water for 12 hours to give the stomach a rest. Then give a small, bland meal of rice and boiled hamburger meat, cottage cheese, or chicken and rice soup. Feeding your Italian Greyhound one or two tablespoons of this diet every few hours is enough. If he is able to keep the food down, you can gradually return him to his regular diet.

Take your Italian Greyhound to the vet right away if vomiting continues even though your Italian Greyhound hasn’t eaten for several hours, the vomitus contains blood, or the Italian Greyhound seems weak and listless. Diarrhea is another warning sign. A Italian Greyhound who’s vomiting and has diarrhea can quickly become dehydrated.

Loose or liquid stools characterize diarrhea. Most often, diarrhea occurs when a Italian Greyhound eats something indigestible that irritates the stomach or bowel. Other times the irritant is a food to which the Italian Greyhound is sensitive, such as certain meats, spices, fats, milk products, and grains. Each Italian Greyhound is different, so it’s hard to say exactly what might cause a bout of diarrhea. Intestinal parasites, anxiety, or excitement can also cause diarrhea. The reason the stool is runny or liquid is because the food passes rapidly through the bowel before it has time to remove the water.

If diarrhea is a problem, be prepared to tell your veterinarian its color (yellow, greenish, black, bloody, light, or gray), consistency (watery, foamy, mucuslike), and odor (foodlike or rancid). Mild cases of diarrhea can be treated at home by withholding food for 24 hours while still giving the Italian Greyhound plenty of water to drink. Take the Italian Greyhound to the veterinarian if diarrhea continues for more than 24 hours, the stool looks bloody or black and tarry, the Italian Greyhound is also vomiting, or the Italian Greyhound seems weak or has a fever.

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Euthanasia and your Italian Greyhound

Euthanasia and your Italian Greyhound

Whether you decide to put your Italian Greyhound to sleep at home or in your veterinarian’s office, there are a few basic procedures. If possible, make arrangements for payment and body transportation and final disposition before putting your Italian Greyhound to sleep. This is a traumatic event for you, and you shouldn’t need to deal with the mundanities of finding your checkbook or deciphering bills at this time. A good veterinarian will be happy to bill you or have you pay beforehand. If done at a clinic, your vet should be willing to euthanize first thing in the morning or at the end of the day when there are fewer patients waiting, and you should be allowed to wait in an exam room rather than in the waiting room.

Your vet should give you the option of being in the room with your Italian Greyhound as he dies. Although it is a personal decision, many people who opt not to be in the room later regret the decision. Most people find comfort in seeing that as their Italian Greyhound dies, he feels no pain and simply slips away.

If you opt to have your Italian Greyhound euthanized at home, you can allow him to choose a location to lie down or lay him in a location of your choice. If he loved to sleep on the sofa or bed, he may feel most comfortable here. His favorite snoozing spot under a shady tree can also be soothing to both of you. If you are indoors, place an old blanket under your Italian Greyhound. Do not be alarmed if your Italian Greyhound seems to perk up when the veterinarian arrives; this is very normal and it does not mean that he has recovered or that you are doing the wrong thing.

Many Italian Greyhounds retain their fun-loving personalities well into their senior years.

Before putting your Italian Greyhound to sleep, your vet will probably administer a sedative. Your Italian Greyhound will become sleepy and lie down. This is a good time to say your last good-byes—give a last kiss and head rub. Then your veterinarian will administer a lethal dose of sodium pentobarbital. Your Italian Greyhound will rapidly lose consciousness and soon after, his heart will stop. Let your veterinarian know if you would like to spend time with your Italian Greyhound following his passing. A good veterinarian will accommodate your wishes.

 

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Adding a Second Italian Greyhound to Your Home

Adding a Second Italian Greyhound to Your Home

Introducing a new Italian Greyhound to your family may be disconcerting to your current Italian Greyhound. If he is used to having you all to himself, he may be jealous of the attention you pay to the new Italian Greyhound. There are some things you can do to ease the social transition for both of them:

When you do something fun with one Italian Greyhound, make sure the other gets something good, too.

Teach your Italian Greyhounds to take turns by saying each Italian Greyhound’s name before you hand him a treat or a toy. This will teach them to wait to hear their names before taking an item from you.

If either Italian Greyhound gets too pushy or rowdy with the other or tries to guard you as private property, give him a time-out alone for five to ten minutes.

When you’re not home to supervise, keep the Italian Greyhounds separated until their relationship is stable.

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Don’t allow your Italian Greyhound puppy to have access to your cat unless you are present to supervise the interaction. If your Italian Greyhound puppy starts bothering the cat, put a leash on him, and give him the command leave it. This is a good opportunity to begin teaching him this important command. Enforce the command by picking up the leash and bringing your Italian Greyhound puppy toward you. Do this consistently each time your Italian Greyhound puppy begins to harass the cat.

Other animals such as birds, rodents, and reptiles may also fall victim to your Italian Greyhound puppy’s harassment if you don’t intercede. Use the same method to teach your Italian Greyhound puppy to leave these pets alone. If you are consistent, your Italian Greyhound puppy will eventually learn that your other pets don’t appreciate his attempts to play. In time, he should leave them alone. If you find that your Italian Greyhound doesn’t back off and becomes obsessed or aggressive with any of your other pets, consult a professional trainer for advice.

Italian Greyhounds can get along with cats as long as they are introduced early in life.

The process of socializing your Italian Greyhound puppy to an older Italian Greyhound in the home will take some time. Keep your Italian Greyhound puppy on a leash when with existing household Italian Greyhounds until everyone is comfortable. Let the older Italian Greyhound go to the Italian Greyhound puppy to investigate. He’ll probably sniff him all over and may exhibit some dominant postures. Most Italian Greyhound puppies respond to this with appropriately submissive behaviors such as licking the older Italian Greyhound’s muzzle, flipping on his back and exposing his tummy, or even urinating. If the Italian Greyhound puppy becomes too boisterous or does not exhibit suitably submissive postures, your older Italian Greyhound may scold him with a gruff bark or growl. He may even pin him down and hold him until the Italian Greyhound puppy is calmer. All of these responses are normal and will help your Italian Greyhound puppy mature into a respectful adult. However, if your older Italian Greyhound is consistently aggressive or injures your Italian Greyhound puppy, consult a professional trainer. You should also seek the advice of a professional trainer if your existing Italian Greyhound refuses to acknowledge the new Italian Greyhound puppy. Sometimes extra help is needed to integrate a household, and in some cases a family Italian Greyhound simply will not accept an interloper. When adopting your Italian Greyhound puppy from a breeder or shelter, be sure you have the option of returning the Italian Greyhound puppy if your existing Italian Greyhound will not accept him. Your older Italian Greyhound should come first.

A new Italian Greyhound puppy will be naturally submissive to your older Italian Greyhound. Do not interfere when your Italian Greyhound disciplines the Italian Greyhound puppy, who needs to be taught proper behavior.

You can help keep the proper balance by making sure to provide your older Italian Greyhound with as much or more attention as the new Italian Greyhound puppy, always feeding and giving the older Italian Greyhound treats and toys first, and generally respecting his role as the elder statesman. Eventually your Italian Greyhounds will work out their hierarchy but for now, your old friend should be top Italian Greyhound. Never leave a Italian Greyhound puppy alone with an older Italian Greyhound, even if they seem to get along well when supervised. An older, larger Italian Greyhound can seriously injure a young Italian Greyhound puppy. Keep your Italian Greyhound puppy warm and secure in his crate when you aren’t able to supervise.

Because you don’t want your Italian Greyhound puppy to spend his entire life within the four walls of your home, it’s important for you to socialize him to all the fun and scary things the world has to offer. Take him to outdoor malls and markets, busy parks, and downtown streets. Introduce him to strangers and encourage all types of people to pet him. Always bring an ample supply of treats to lubricate friendships.

It’s also a good idea to periodically leave your Italian Greyhound puppy in the care of someone else for an afternoon, a day, or even a week during the first year of his life. This could be a friend, a relative, or a boarding kennel. It’s good for your Italian Greyhound puppy to experience life without you for short periods of time so he’s knows he can be OK, even when Mom or Dad isn’t around.

In addition to taking your older Italian Greyhound puppy to different places, give him new experiences close to home. Look for opportunities to go up and down stairs with him. Have him walk over plastic garbage bags laid flat on the ground. Sit in the kitchen with him while the dishwasher is running, and keep him outside with you while you are mowing the lawn. Let him be in the next room when you turn on the vacuum for the first time, and gradually let him approach it if he desires. Run appliances, drop pans on the floor, and generally make a ruckus, keeping it jolly and fun for your Italian Greyhound puppy all the while. If he acts fearful, introduce him to the source of the fear slowly but with a lot of treats and upbeat happy talk.

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