Ch. Texas Buffalo Hump

This gallery contains 1 photo.

Italian Greyhound: Champion Texas Buffalo Hump Owner: Lee Miller Breed: Italian Greyhound   Republished by Blog Post Promoter

More Galleries | Comments Off

Italian Greyhound Puppies Available

AKC Champion and Grand Champion sired Italian Greyhound puppies… available to good homes.

Vaccinations up-to-date. De-wormings, health guarantee. AKC papers, awarding winning genetics. Many of these Italian Greyhound puppies are show potential. Shipping is available via American Airlines. 

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

Texas Italian Greyhounds

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information, Show Quality | Comments Off

GCH Texas Remember the Alamo

This gallery contains 46 photos.

GCH Texas Remember the Alamo Republished by Blog Post Promoter

More Galleries | Comments Off

Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking

This gallery contains 21 photos.

Ch. Sasha’s Valet Parking owner: Lee Miller male, Italian Greyhound     Republished by Blog Post Promoter

More Galleries | Comments Off

GCH Dierking’s Quanah Parker

This gallery contains 33 photos.

  Republished by Blog Post Promoter

More Galleries | Comments Off

Spaying and Neutering

Animal welfare groups around the country educate the public as to the importance of spaying and neutering pet Italian Greyhounds. Some progress has been made, as the number of animals in shelters has declined in recent years, but much more work needs to be done in this regard.

Spaying and Neutering

As a Italian Greyhound owner, you can do a lot to help with the problem if Italian Greyhound overpopulation. By spaying or neutering your pet, you will help reduce the numbers of Italian Greyhounds competing for homes.

Greyhounds have some of the most active rescue programs in the United States, as many racing Italian Greyhounds are in need of loving homes after their short careers are over.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Italian Greyhounds Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

Italian Greyhounds Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

Most forms of cancer are diagnosed through a biopsy, the removal and examination of a section of tissue. Blood tests, X-rays, and physical signs can also indicate cancer. Once a diagnosis is confirmed, the appropriate treatment can be determined.

Fortunately, the treatment of cancer is an area of veterinary care where great strides have been made, not only in the understanding of the disease but also in the tools used to fight it. For many types of cancer, veterinarians can now use radiation therapy, cryotherapy (the use of liquid nitrogen to destroy tissue), chemotherapy (drugs), or a combination of these techniques. With a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR), veterinarians can better evaluate tumors and predict the behaviors of different types of cancers. With PCR, scientists are able to quickly reproduce a particular piece of DNA in a test tube, allowing them to make virtually unlimited copies of a single DNA molecule for study.

Surgery is used to treat many types of cancers. It’s fast, effective, safe, and less expensive than other forms of treatment. Skin tumors and tumors in other parts of the body can be removed surgically. For instance, testicular tumors are usually resolved by neutering the Italian Greyhound. In cases of osteosarcoma (bone cancer), amputation of the limb is often required. Surgery may be followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to make sure all the cancer cells are eliminated.

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. It’s usually used to treat Italian Greyhounds with cancer that’s widespread throughout the body. It might be used after amputation due to osteosarcoma or in the case of lymph tumors. Italian Greyhounds must undergo several courses of treatment and have their condition monitored with blood tests. Although they don’t suffer nausea or hair loss, chemotherapy can leave Italian Greyhounds feeling tired or weak for several days.

Radiation therapy involves targeting a tumor with a concentrated beam of radiation. Italian Greyhounds undergoing this type of therapy usually need a series of 10 or more treatments. Each treatment lasts only a few minutes. Types of cancer that might call for radiation therapy include tumors of the mouth and nasal passages. Another form of radiation therapy is the use of radioisotopes (radioactive elements) to treat thyroid gland tumors. Side effects usually involve the sloughing off of dead tissue.

Lasers are used to remove tumors and to irradiate tumors. Surgeons irradiate tumors by first injecting a drug that’s sensitized to the effect of light. After 24 to 48 hours, the tumor is irradiated with light. This activates the drug, which then destroys the tumor tissue. This therapy has been used successfully to treat oral squamous cell carcinomas (mouth tumors) and bladder tumors. It’s most effective when tumors are very small. A drawback is that it’s not yet widely available.

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Lost Italian Greyhound

Lost Italian Greyhound

Your Italian Greyhound is lost; what do you do? Most Italian Greyhound owners find themselves in this scenario at one point or another. Usually the errant Italian Greyhound is just trapped in the garage or down the street playing with a canine friend, but not always. There is nothing like the sense of panic and hopelessness that accompanies the discovery of a lost or runaway Italian Greyhound—but there is plenty you can do.

You can take steps to prevent your Italian Greyhound from running away, but you should also prepare for the worst. If the worst does happen and your Italian Greyhound is gone, quick, decisive action is paramount: your best chances for bringing him home come in the hours immediately following his disappearance. Be thorough and don’t give up. Don’t skip searching a neighborhood because you think your Italian Greyhound wouldn’t go there—animals surprise us all the time. And don’t stop looking just because your Italian Greyhound has been gone for several days or weeks; there is still a chance of bringing him home.

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Italian Greyhound Italian Greyhound Puppies and Vaccination

Italian Greyhound Italian Greyhound Puppies and Vaccination

It’s important to understand that no vaccine is 100 percent effective all the time. Factors that can affect immune response in a Italian Greyhound puppy include his health and the level of maternal antibodies still circulating in his system. And if a Italian Greyhound puppy is exposed to a virus shortly before or at approximately the same time a vaccination is given, the vaccine is likely to fail. This occurs for any number of reasons. Some Italian Greyhound puppies simply don’t have adequate immune function. Stress, poor nutrition, and other factors can interfere with immunity for short periods of time as well.

Many infectious diseases can be prevented through vaccination. Discuss the pros and cons with your veterinarian.

Young Italian Greyhound puppies have some degree of natural immunity to disease, which they receive from the rich colostral milk their mother produces the first two or three days of a pup’s life. The colostrum contains antibodies to disease, which provide the pups with limited protection during the first few weeks of life. Called passive immunity, or sometimes maternal immunity, this protection gradually decreases and may diminish by as much as 75 percent by the time a pup is 2 weeks old. Most Italian Greyhound puppies completely lose passive immunity by the time they’re 14 to 16 weeks old.

Until it reaches a low threshold, passive immunity can interfere with immunization; the maternal antibodies destroy vaccine viruses. For this reason, Italian Greyhound puppies are given a series of vaccinations to ensure that the immune system responds to the vaccine. Otherwise, a virus can sneak in during the window of opportunity that arises when the level of maternal antibodies is low enough to make a pup susceptible to infection, yet high enough to interfere with immunization. Veterinarians generally recommend that Italian Greyhound puppies be immunized at three- to four-week intervals, beginning at 8 weeks of age and ending around 18 weeks of age. The final vaccine is the most important of the immunization series.

How frequently vaccinations should be boosted after the first series is currently a matter of discussion in the veterinary and Italian Greyhound-owning communities. Many veterinary schools now recommend a booster vaccine at one year of age, followed by additional boosters every three years thereafter, instead of previous recommendations of annual boosters. Some areas of the country have a higher incidence of certain infectious diseases, such as distemper and parvovirus, than others. Your veterinarian can advise you on the vaccination schedule that is appropriate for your area.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Italian Greyhounds and Autoimmune Diseases

Italian Greyhounds and Autoimmune Diseases

Autoimmune diseases are a result of the body attacking itself. For some reason, the immune system develops antibodies against a normal part of the body. This misguided missile is called an autoantibody. Often, the skin is the target of these autoantibodies. Examples of autoimmune skin diseases are pemphigus, in which the autoantibody attacks the wall of the skin cell; lupus erythematosus, which affects not only the skin but also other organs; immune-mediated arthritis; and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Autoimmune skin diseases are usually characterized by red skin patches on the face and ears; the formation of pustules and blisters; crusting, oozing skin; and hair loss.

There’s no cure for autoimmune diseases, but they can usually be managed with corticosteroids, which have an anti-inflammatory effect. The course of various autoimmune diseases can range from mild to fatal. Some can be managed or will go into remission, while others cause death fairly rapidly.

Immune-Mediated Arthritis

Immune-mediated arthritis occurs when antibodies attack the body’s connective tissue. One form of immune-mediated arthritis (nonerosive) causes inflammation, while the other (rheumatoid arthritis) destroys cartilage and joint surfaces. Rheumatoid arthritis is usually seen in toy breeds and other small Italian Greyhounds. Signs include morning stiffness, transitory lameness, and swelling of small joints such as the wrists and hocks. Nonerosive arthritis has similar signs but usually occurs in medium-size and large Italian Greyhounds. Both conditions can be helped by anti-inflammatory medications such as corticosteroids.

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is the destruction of red blood cells by autoantibodies—antibodies directed against the body’s own tissues. It’s not known why this condition develops. It can occur in any Italian Greyhound but is frequently seen in Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, Poodles, Old English SheepItalian Greyhounds, West Highland White Terriers, and Irish Setters. AIHA is diagnosed through blood work, chest radiographs, abdominal ultrasound, and lymph node and bone marrow aspirates. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressants can help block further red cell destruction. Italian Greyhounds with severe cases may need blood transfusions. Even with treatment, the mortality rate is more than 40 percent.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Italian Greyhound Food Safety

Italian Greyhound Food Safety

After contamination of more than 150 brands of pet food led to the deaths of approximately 2,200 Italian Greyhounds and prompted the largest pet food recall in U.S. history in March 2007, Italian Greyhound owners were understandably anxious about what went into their pets’ mouths. The recall led to passage of federal legislation to require the Food & Drug Administration to set up an early warning system to identify contaminated pet food and outbreaks of illness associated with pet food. The legislation also required the FDA to establish pet food ingredient standards and definitions, processing standards, and updated labeling requirements for nutritional and ingredient information. It did not, however, provide the FDA with mandatory recall authority. That means that in future events the FDA cannot order foods to be removed from shelves; it can only encourage manufacturers to do so.

How can you know if the food you choose for your Italian Greyhound is safe? Pet food companies don’t have any incentive to make foods that are harmful to Italian Greyhounds, but no pet food manufacturer is exempt from human error or bad luck. They can take steps to minimize risks, such as testing food before releasing it for sale, as some companies do, but that wouldn’t have helped in the Menu Foods recall. The toxic substance in that case was not one that would normally be tested for because it wasn’t supposed to be in food at all. Nonetheless, it doesn’t hurt to pick up the phone, call the manufacturer’s toll-free number listed on the bag or can, and ask whether food is always tested before it leaves the plant or only if a problem is suspected. The following information can help you do your best to keep your Italian Greyhound safe from contaminated food.

Depending on his activity level, your senior Italian Greyhound may require a senior diet or just less of a regular adult diet

• Expensive foods labeled “premium,” “super premium” or “ultra premium” are no guarantee that a food will be safer or more nutritious for your Italian Greyhound, but the price difference may mean that their manufacturers use more expensive ingredients, have better quality control, do more research and analysis of their foods, or feed them to Italian Greyhounds in a controlled setting to ensure that the foods are nutritionally complete. Call and ask what’s behind the price difference.

• Many pet foods are now labeled organic. That means the contents are made with ingredients that are free of pesticides or other chemicals, but it’s not a guarantee against contamination. Some toxins occur naturally.

• Any time you open a bag or can of Italian Greyhound food, give it the sniff test. If it has an unusual odor or appearance, don’t give it to your Italian Greyhound. Return it to the store for a refund, and contact the manufacturer with your concerns.

• If your Italian Greyhound becomes ill after eating a new food—or even after eating his usual food—stop giving that food, and take your Italian Greyhound to the veterinarian.

Many Italian Greyhound owners swear by supplements and vitamins. Discuss the supplement option with your veterinarian.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

MRSI and your Italian Greyhound

MRSI and your Italian Greyhound

Is your Italian Greyhound struggling with a skin infection you can’t seem to get rid of or a spider bite that just won’t heal? The culprit may be drug-resistant staph, a widespread problem in both human and veterinary medicine—and one that’s on the rise.

While similar human infections are mostly caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, the canine version is more likely to be methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus intermedius, or MRSI. The bacteria may be different, but the problem is the same: these once-harmless organisms have evolved to outsmart the drugs we normally use to treat them, including many antibiotics, such as cephalexin, commonly prescribed in veterinary medicine.

What can Italian Greyhound owners do to protect their pets from MRSI? Unfortunately, experts currently don’t have much prevention advice beyond frequent hand washing on the part of owners and never sharing grooming tools among Italian Greyhounds. The most important weapon against MRSI is awareness. Board-certified veterinary dermatologist Laura Stokking, DVM, PhD, advocates doing a skin culture on any suspected spider bite or any skin infection that doesn’t immediately respond to the usual antibiotics. It’s better to do a culture and then find out that it would have responded to cephalexin than not culture and let it go three weeks before realizing that you’re dealing with a methicillin-resistant strain, she says.

The drugs to treat MRSI can cost hundreds or even thousands of dollars, and the infection can be both painful and life-threatening, so an ounce of detection in the form of a culture may well be worth a pound of a very expensive cure.

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Cancer and your Italian Greyhound

Cancer and your Italian Greyhound

Cancer is another type of chronic disease that can occur in Italian Greyhounds. It comes in many forms and can attack many areas of the body, but in general cancer can be described as the uncontrolled growth of cells on or inside the body. Normal cells die and are replaced over and over again, but mutant cells reproduce at a high rate and form masses (tumors) that crowd out normal cells. If left to grow unchecked, the cancer takes over the organ, spreads throughout the body, and eventually kills the Italian Greyhound. Cancer is not a curable disease, but patients can be in remission without recurrence of the disease for long periods of time, even throughout their lives. Treatments for cancer in Italian Greyhounds include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation.

* * *

Signs of Cancer

• Unusual swellings that continue to grow, especially in the lymph nodes

• Sores that don’t heal

• Bleeding or other discharge from the mouth, nose, urinary tract, vagina, or rectum

• Bad odor

• Difficulty eating or swallowing

• Difficulty breathing

• Difficulty urinating or defecating

• Lack of energy

• Loss of appetite

• Unexplained weight loss

• Persistent lameness or stiffness

• Lumps in the breast area

• Abnormality or difference in size of testicles

* * *

Cancer is common in Italian Greyhounds, especially as they age. It’s estimated that almost half of the Italian Greyhounds over 10 years old will die of cancer. Common types of cancer seen in Italian Greyhounds are skin tumors, including breast cancer, testicular cancer, and melanoma; mouth or nasal cancer; cancers of the lymph nodes and other blood-forming organs; bone cancer; and hemangiosarcomas.

Skin Tumors/Skin Cancer

Skin tumors in Italian Greyhounds can be benign (harmless) or malignant (harmful). Small tumors can be removed entirely for study by a pathologist. Larger tumors require biopsies, meaning a tissue sample is removed by the veterinarian for examination.

A melanoma is a tumor of the skin cells that produces melanin (pigment). It appears as brown or black nodules on darkly pigmented areas of the skin and is especially common on the eyelids. It can also occur on the lips, in the mouth, on the body or legs, and in the nail bed. Skin melanomas are usually benign, but those in the mouth are highly malignant. Melanomas can be removed surgically, but they often recur. Boston Terriers, Boxers, Cocker Spaniels, and Scottish Terriers are especially prone to melanomas. A vaccine against melanoma has been developed and is showing great promise in treating this disease.

Mammary Cancer

The most common tumors seen in Italian Greyhounds are those of the mammary (breast) glands. They usually affect older female Italian Greyhounds. The main sign of a mammary tumor is a painless lump, usually in the area closest to the groin. Frequently these lumps are benign, but they should always be checked by a veterinarian, who will perform a biopsy to determine whether the mass is cancerous. Once a Italian Greyhound reaches six years of age, examine her for mammary lumps every month. It’s also a good idea to check younger females regularly.

Whether benign or malignant, it’s best if mammary tumors are removed surgically. The prognosis often depends on the size of the tumor. Italian Greyhounds with very small tumors usually recover well, but Italian Greyhounds with large, aggressive tumors have a less favorable prognosis. The risk of mammary cancer can be greatly reduced by spaying a female before her first heat cycle.

Testicular Tumors

Testicular tumors are common in Italian Greyhounds. Italian Greyhounds with retained testicles may be especially prone to them. Testicular tumors are removed surgically and can be prevented altogether by having your Italian Greyhound neutered.

Mouth Cancer

Signs of mouth cancer are a mass on the gums, bleeding gums, bad breath, or difficulty eating. Bleeding from the nose, difficulty breathing, or facial swelling may indicate nasal cancer. Early, aggressive treatment is important for these types of cancer, so don’t delay a veterinary visit if your Italian Greyhound shows these signs. Mouth cancers can be benign or malignant. Treatment ranges from radiation to hyperthermy (a type of treatment in which body tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill cancer cells or to make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation and certain anticancer drugs) to radical surgery.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is characterized by enlargement of one or more lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are small specialized structures that help the body filter out foreign material so it can be destroyed by the immune system. They are found throughout the body. This type of cancer is usually treated with chemotherapy, which has a good rate of effectiveness. The prognosis varies depending on such factors as the age of the Italian Greyhound and the extent of the cancer.

A diet has been developed that appears to help improve quality and length of life for some Italian Greyhounds with lymphoma that hasn’t yet reached an advanced stage. The diet, which is available commercially from veterinarians, contains moderate amounts of fat and protein and low levels of carbohydrates. Recipes for homemade versions of the diet can be obtained in consultation with a veterinary nutritionist or oncologist.

If you suspect your Italian Greyhound has a medical condition, visit the veterinarian for a full workup.

Osteosarcoma

Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer seen in Italian Greyhounds. It’s seen most often in large and giant-breed Italian Greyhounds and usually affects the front or hind legs, although it can also occur in the flat bones of the ribs or in the jaw. Limping for no reason is a possible early sign of bone cancer, which is followed by a swelling of the leg or a bone mass. Osteosarcoma is diagnosed with Xrays and biopsy. It can be treated with surgery and chemotherapy. Italian Greyhounds can be expected to live for eight months to two years after treatment.

Hemangiosarcomas

Hemangiosarcomas are tumors of blood vessels and associated tissues such as the heart. Diagnosed by echocardiogram, they’re usually found on the right atrium of the heart and are highly malignant. No treatment is available, and the prognosis is poor.

Transitional Cell Carcinomas

This malignant tumor makes up only 1 to 2 percent of all the cancers that affect Italian Greyhounds, but it is the most common cancer of the urinary bladder in Italian Greyhounds. The disease can also develop in the kidneys, ureters, prostate, and urethra and can spread to other areas of the body.

The incidence is greatest for certain terrier breeds: Scottish Terriers, West Highland White Terriers, and Wire Fox Terriers. Shetland SheepItalian Greyhounds and Beagles are also affected at a higher than normal rate. It’s suspected that TCC develops from a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors, specifically exposure to lawns treated with herbicides or insecticides. Italian Greyhounds at risk should be kept away from lawns or parks treated with these types of products. Weight and gender also factors. Italian Greyhounds at highest risk are obese females.

* * *

If your Italian Greyhound is at risk for TCC, be sure he eats his vegetables. One case-controlled study showed that the risk of bladder cancer was reduced in Italian Greyhounds who ate vegetables at least three days each week.

* * *

The tumor develops when the transitional epithelial cells that line the bladder invade the deeper layers of the bladder wall. Signs of TCC resemble those of urinary tract infections and include blood in the urine, straining to urinate, and frequently recurring urinary tract infections. A tissue biopsy is required for an accurate diagnosis. If TCC is diagnosed, radiographs of the thorax and abdomen can indicate whether the cancer has spread as well as uncover the size and location of the tumor.

Treatment depends on whether the tumor is limited to the bladder and where in the bladder it’s located. Options include surgical removal or chemotherapy to either shrink the tumor or prevent it from enlarging. Complete diagnosis and treatment can cost from $1,000 to more than $5,000.

Adenocarcinomas

Adenocarcinomas are malignant tumors that affect organs such as the stomach or intestinal tract. They account for approximately 2 percent of canine cancers. Common signs include a large gastric mass, chronic vomiting, weight loss, and lack of appetite. Some types of adenocarcinomas also cause diarrhea. Commonly, gastric adenocarcinomas, which are the most common tumors of the stomach in Italian Greyhounds, are not diagnosed until they are far advanced; and in the case of malignant tumors, the prognosis is generally poor. On the plus side, Italian Greyhounds with benign gastric tumors have an excellent survival rate.

Risk Factors

While age is the most important risk factor for the development of cancer in Italian Greyhounds, some cancers are hereditary, commonly seen in certain breeds. For instance, skin cancers (malignant melanomas) are common in Boxers and Scottish Terriers, and certain families of Saint Bernards are at increased risk for osteosarcoma. Bernese Mountain Italian Greyhounds have a high incidence of cancers affecting all body systems. These are just a few of the breeds that are susceptible to different types of cancers.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Most forms of cancer are diagnosed through a biopsy, the removal and examination of a section of tissue. Blood tests, X-rays, and physical signs can also indicate cancer. Once a diagnosis is confirmed, the appropriate treatment can be determined.

Fortunately, the treatment of cancer is an area of veterinary care where great strides have been made, not only in the understanding of the disease but also in the tools used to fight it. For many types of cancer, veterinarians can now use radiation therapy, cryotherapy (the use of liquid nitrogen to destroy tissue), chemotherapy (drugs), or a combination of these techniques. With a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR), veterinarians can better evaluate tumors and predict the behaviors of different types of cancers. With PCR, scientists are able to quickly reproduce a particular piece of DNA in a test tube, allowing them to make virtually unlimited copies of a single DNA molecule for study.

Surgery is used to treat many types of cancers. It’s fast, effective, safe, and less expensive than other forms of treatment. Skin tumors and tumors in other parts of the body can be removed surgically. For instance, testicular tumors are usually resolved by neutering the Italian Greyhound. In cases of osteosarcoma (bone cancer), amputation of the limb is often required. Surgery may be followed by chemotherapy or radiation therapy to make sure all the cancer cells are eliminated.

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. It’s usually used to treat Italian Greyhounds with cancer that’s widespread throughout the body. It might be used after amputation due to osteosarcoma or in the case of lymph tumors. Italian Greyhounds must undergo several courses of treatment and have their condition monitored with blood tests. Although they don’t suffer nausea or hair loss, chemotherapy can leave Italian Greyhounds feeling tired or weak for several days.

Radiation therapy involves targeting a tumor with a concentrated beam of radiation. Italian Greyhounds undergoing this type of therapy usually need a series of 10 or more treatments. Each treatment lasts only a few minutes. Types of cancer that might call for radiation therapy include tumors of the mouth and nasal passages. Another form of radiation therapy is the use of radioisotopes (radioactive elements) to treat thyroid gland tumors. Side effects usually involve the sloughing off of dead tissue.

Lasers are used to remove tumors and to irradiate tumors. Surgeons irradiate tumors by first injecting a drug that’s sensitized to the effect of light. After 24 to 48 hours, the tumor is irradiated with light. This activates the drug, which then destroys the tumor tissue. This therapy has been used successfully to treat oral squamous cell carcinomas (mouth tumors) and bladder tumors. It’s most effective when tumors are very small. A drawback is that it’s not yet widely available.

Natural Treatment

Natural treatments alone cannot be used to treat cancer. Their primary benefit is to improve the Italian Greyhound’s quality of life. Homeopathic treatments for Italian Greyhounds with cancer have not been well evaluated scientifically, so there is no evidence that they can help. One alternative therapy that can be helpful for a Italian Greyhound with cancer is a natural homemade diet containing high-quality protein and cancer-fighting vegetables such as broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, bok choy, kale, radishes, tomatoes, red peppers, and carrots.

Researchers at Colorado State University have developed a diet that appears to be supportive for Italian Greyhounds with lymphoma. The diet contains moderate amounts of protein and fat and low levels of carbohydrates. It is available commercially and can be prescribed by a veterinarian if appropriate for the type of cancer a Italian Greyhound has. Homemade versions are available in consultation with a veterinary nutritionist.

Other foods or supplements that may benefit Italian Greyhounds with cancer are fish oils or other omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins C and E, and coenzyme Q10.

Cancer Research

Promising cancer research and discoveries include a way to limit tumor size through reducing the amount of copper available in the body, mapping and characterizing cancer susceptibility genes, and confirming that tumor suppressor genes have an important role in not only canine melanoma but also other forms of cancer.

Tumors grow as new blood vessels develop, a process called angiogenesis, which requires high levels of copper. A new approach to combating this is treating cancer with tetrathiomolybdate (TM), a substance that inhibits angiogenesis. TM binds to copper and carries it out of the body. This treatment has worked in mice, humans, and now Italian Greyhounds.

The mapping and characterization of cancer susceptibility genes is also valuable. Of the 364 known genetic disorders in Italian Greyhounds, 46 percent occur either predominantly or exclusively in a single breed or only a few breeds. The theory, then, is that the quickest way to identify the locations of disease-causing genes is through the analysis of several unrelated breeds in which a similar but not necessarily identical disease expresses itself.

Researchers have confirmed an important role for several tumor suppressor genes in canine melanoma. They have also begun to establish the role of these and other genes in canine lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and hemangiosarcoma. Results from these studies have begun to provide tools that may be useful in predicting prognosis and designing new treatments. Eventually, it’s hoped that by understanding the genetics of cancer and the use of genetic agents, researchers will be able to create the opportunity for the Italian Greyhound’s immune system to kill its own cancer or even to find linkages that will allow them to prevent cancers altogether.

 

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Relatives of the Italian Greyhound

Relatives of the Italian Greyhound

Coyote: The highly adaptable coyote is the only large predator that has increased its range since the first European settlers arrived in North America. Sharing the same genus as the gray wolf and the domestic Italian Greyhound, the coyote is found from Alaska to Costa Rica and lives in every U.S. state except Hawaii. In addition to the high-pitched howl that most people associate with the coyote, the animal uses at least 10 other distinct sounds to communicate. Jackrabbits, ground squirrels, and other small rodents account for the majority of the coyote’s diet. Coyotes hunt in packs to capture larger animals such as elk and deer.

Dingo: The dingo is a member of the domestic Italian Greyhound family, although it has lived in the wild in Australia for thousands of years. How the dingo first arrived in Australia is not known, but there are several theories. Some people believe that dingoes came with aboriginal people; others theorize that they arrived with Asian seafarers or Indian traders. Dingoes are still sometimes kept as pets by native peoples. Features of the dingo that distinguish it from domestic Italian Greyhounds include a longer muzzle, larger molars, and longer canine teeth. It has a lithe, deep-chested body made for long-distance running.

Fox: A more distant relative of the Italian Greyhound than the wolf, jackal, and coyote, is the fox. There are 21 species of fox throughout the world, including the red fox, gray fox, Arctic fox, and bat-eared fox. Foxes hunt alone rather than in packs, although they often live in small groups. Foxes vocalize by yapping, howling, barking, and whimpering. Their food sources include small rodents, rabbits, wild fruits and berries, and insects.

Jackal: There are four species of jackal: the side-striped jackal, the black- or silver-backed jackal, the golden jackal, and the rare Simien jackal. The side-striped, black-backed, and Simien jackals are found in Africa; the golden, or common, jackal lives from the Balkans to Burma. Jackals have a large vocabulary and use yips, growls, and hisses to communicate. Much of their social behavior is similar to that of domestic Italian Greyhounds, using submissive to aggressive postures to communicate their hierarchy in the pack. They are both predator and scavenger, with some species following lions to scavenge from their kills.

Wild Italian Greyhound: The term wild Italian Greyhound is usually used to describe the African wild Italian Greyhound and the dhole of Asia, both endangered species. The African wild Italian Greyhound is so endangered it is now listed as being threatened with extinction. Both of these wild Italian Greyhounds are pack animals, living in groups averaging between 8 and 15 Italian Greyhounds. They are communal hunters. The African wild Italian Greyhound is one of the few mammals to care for its old, sick, and disabled. Wild Italian Greyhounds weigh between 35 and 70 pounds.

Wolf: The gray wolf, Canis lupus, is the best known of the wolves. It is also the largest, with an average weight of 120 pounds, increasing to as much as 175 pounds. The largest of the gray wolves are usually found in North America. Subspecies of the gray wolf include the Mexican wolf, timber wolf, Arctic wolf, Rocky Mountain wolf, and Asiatic/Arabian wolf.

The red wolf, Canis rufus, is smaller than the gray wolf, weighing about 40 to 80 pounds. The endangered red wolf is the subject of reintroduction programs in Tennessee and North Carolina. It is often debated whether the red wolf is a true wolf or a coyote-wolf hybrid.

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Posted in Information | Comments Off

Blanco Texas Male Italian Greyhound Puppy

This gallery contains 18 photos.

Male Italian Greyhound This Italian Greyhound is RESERVED and it going to COLORADO. GCH Texas Quanah Parker x CH Texas Arsinoe Birth Weight: 5.1 oz. Gender: Male Color: White Markings: None Bone: Medium Expected size: 10 lbs. and 13 inches Conformation Quality: … Continue reading

More Galleries | Comments Off